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Concept Paper

Disaggregating the Asian “Other”: Heterogeneity and Methodological Issues in Research on Asian Americans with Disabilities

1
Department of Disability and Human Development, Institute on Disability and Human Development, and Undergraduate Rehabilitation Sciences Program, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60608, USA
2
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10065, USA
3
School of Social Work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Societies 2020, 10(3), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030058
Received: 1 July 2020 / Revised: 18 July 2020 / Accepted: 21 July 2020 / Published: 28 July 2020
Asian Americans comprise the fastest growing racial or ethnic group in the US. Between 2000 and 2019, their numbers almost doubled, from 11.9 million to 22.2 million. The numbers of people with disabilities within this demographically important population, which are also growing, puts stress on the service delivery sector. This situation indicates a pressing need for research on lived experiences of disabled Asian Americans. A review of the extant literature shows that Asian Americans are underrepresented in the research on disability and/or mental health. This lack of hard data is compounded by the tendency to treat Asian ethnicities as monolithic. The US Census Bureau recognizes more than 20 distinct Asian nationalities, ranging from South Asian Pakistani Americans to Southeast Asian Americans. Aggregating all Asian Americans together in surveys and studies impedes a sophisticated understanding of their unique needs and strengths. From a policy or systems perspective, inadequate data representation in the research literature, including outdated conclusions, is an implicit form of disenfranchisement. This conceptual article examines issues and implications around the lack of systematic attention to diversity within the Asian American population in disability research. View Full-Text
Keywords: research methods; disparity; disaggregating data; Asian Americans; disability; mental health; model minority myth research methods; disparity; disaggregating data; Asian Americans; disability; mental health; model minority myth
MDPI and ACS Style

Hasnain, R.; Fujiura, G.T.; Capua, J.E.; Bui, T.T.T.; Khan, S. Disaggregating the Asian “Other”: Heterogeneity and Methodological Issues in Research on Asian Americans with Disabilities. Societies 2020, 10, 58. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030058

AMA Style

Hasnain R, Fujiura GT, Capua JE, Bui TTT, Khan S. Disaggregating the Asian “Other”: Heterogeneity and Methodological Issues in Research on Asian Americans with Disabilities. Societies. 2020; 10(3):58. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030058

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hasnain, Rooshey, Glenn T. Fujiura, John E. Capua, Tuyen T.T. Bui, and Safiy Khan. 2020. "Disaggregating the Asian “Other”: Heterogeneity and Methodological Issues in Research on Asian Americans with Disabilities" Societies 10, no. 3: 58. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc10030058

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