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Training Management of the Elite Adolescent Soccer Player throughout Maturation

1
Football Medicine & Sports Science, Manchester United F.C., AON Training Complex, Manchester M31 4BH, UK
2
Department of Sport Science, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham NG1 4FQ, UK
3
Musculoskeletal Science and Sports Medicine Research Centre, Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 6BH, UK
4
Manchester Institute of Sport, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 7EL, UK
5
Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jon Oliver
Sports 2021, 9(12), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9120170
Received: 31 October 2021 / Revised: 12 December 2021 / Accepted: 14 December 2021 / Published: 17 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Talent Identification and Development in Youth Sports)
Professional soccer clubs invest significantly into the development of their academy prospects with the hopes of producing elite players. Talented youngsters in elite development systems are exposed to high amounts of sports-specific practise with the aims of developing the foundational skills underpinning the capabilities needed to excel in the game. Yet large disparities in maturation status, growth-related issues, and highly-specialised sport practise predisposes these elite youth soccer players to an increased injury risk. However, practitioners may scaffold a performance monitoring and injury surveillance framework over an academy to facilitate data-informed training decisions that may not only mitigate this inherent injury risk, but also enhance athletic performance. Constant communication between members of the multi-disciplinary team enables context to build around an individual’s training status and risk profile, and ensures that a progressive, varied, and bespoke training programme is provided at all stages of development to maximise athletic potential. View Full-Text
Keywords: long-term athlete development; soccer; growth and maturation; performance monitoring; injury surveillance long-term athlete development; soccer; growth and maturation; performance monitoring; injury surveillance
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MDPI and ACS Style

McBurnie, A.J.; Dos’Santos, T.; Johnson, D.; Leng, E. Training Management of the Elite Adolescent Soccer Player throughout Maturation. Sports 2021, 9, 170. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9120170

AMA Style

McBurnie AJ, Dos’Santos T, Johnson D, Leng E. Training Management of the Elite Adolescent Soccer Player throughout Maturation. Sports. 2021; 9(12):170. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9120170

Chicago/Turabian Style

McBurnie, Alistair J., Thomas Dos’Santos, David Johnson, and Edward Leng. 2021. "Training Management of the Elite Adolescent Soccer Player throughout Maturation" Sports 9, no. 12: 170. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9120170

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