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Article

Impact of Training Protocols on Lifting Velocity Recovery in Resistance Trained Males and Females

1
Faculty of Sport, Applied Health and Performance Sciences, St. Mary’s University, Twickenham, London TW1 4SX, UK
2
School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK
3
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Science, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3199, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education (IGDORE).
Sports 2021, 9(11), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9110157
Received: 21 October 2021 / Revised: 9 November 2021 / Accepted: 16 November 2021 / Published: 19 November 2021
It has been suggested that sex differences exist in recovery following strength training. This study aimed to investigate the differences in recovery kinetics between resistance trained males and females following two different back squat (BSq) protocols. The first protocol (eight females and eight males) consisted of five sets of five repetitions at 80% of their one-repetition maximum (1RM) in the BSq (SMRT), while the second (seven females and eight males) consisted of five sets to muscular failure (MF) with a 4–6RM load (RMRT). The recovery was quantified with the mean concentric velocity (MV) at 80% of the 1RM immediately before and 5 min, 24, 48, and 72 h after the training protocol. Following the SMRT, a significant between-sex difference, favoring the females, was observed at 5 min, 24 h, and 48 h following the SMRT (p < 0.05, Effect Size (ES) = 1.01–2.25). Following the RMRT, only the males experienced a significant drop in performance after 5 min compared to the baseline (p = 0.025, ES = 1.34). However, no sex differences were observed at any timepoint (p > 0.05). These results suggest that males experienced more fatigue than females following a protocol where the volume relative to the 1RM was matched, while no differences in fatigue were evident following a protocol in which multiple sets were performed to MF. View Full-Text
Keywords: sex differences; velocity; squat; fatigue; fatigability; 1RM; strength training sex differences; velocity; squat; fatigue; fatigability; 1RM; strength training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Amdi, C.H.; Cleather, D.J.; Tallent, J. Impact of Training Protocols on Lifting Velocity Recovery in Resistance Trained Males and Females. Sports 2021, 9, 157. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9110157

AMA Style

Amdi CH, Cleather DJ, Tallent J. Impact of Training Protocols on Lifting Velocity Recovery in Resistance Trained Males and Females. Sports. 2021; 9(11):157. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9110157

Chicago/Turabian Style

Amdi, Christian H., Daniel J. Cleather, and Jamie Tallent. 2021. "Impact of Training Protocols on Lifting Velocity Recovery in Resistance Trained Males and Females" Sports 9, no. 11: 157. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9110157

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