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Article

The Weather Impact on Physical Activity of 6–12 Year Old Children: A Clustered Study of the Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP)

1
School of Health Sciences, Kristiania University College, 0150 Oslo, Norway
2
The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, 0371 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 December 2019 / Revised: 11 January 2020 / Accepted: 14 January 2020 / Published: 19 January 2020
It is commonly known that children do not engage in a sufficient amount of physical activity. Weather conditions and day length may influence physical activity of children. Little is known about the relationship between physical activity and seasons. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between weather conditions and physical activity in 6–12 year old children based on hip-worn Actigraph wGT3X–BT accelerometer data. The study sample consisted of 2015 subjects aged 6–12 years from the Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP) study carried out in Horten municipality and Akershus county, Norway. Six days of sedentary and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity data was gathered in January–June and September–October, 2015, presented as daily averages. The accelerometer-monitored physical activity of children grouped within nine schools was matched with regional weather conditions and assessed with the means of linear mixed models. Increased day length was associated with decreased sedentary behavior. Warmer temperature and dry weather were associated with increased moderate-to-vigorous physical activity after adjusting for age and sex. One-hour increase in daylight resulted in a decrease of sedentary time by, on average, 2 min (95% CI = (−2.577, −0.798)). For every 5 °C increase in temperature (range: −0.95 and 15.51 °C) and dry weather, average moderate-to vigorous physical activity increased by 72 and 67 min (males and females, respectively) (p < 0.001). Days with precipitation had, on average, 10 fewer minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity compared with days without precipitation (95% CI = (−16.704, −3.259)). Higher temperatures and dry weather led to higher physical activity levels, seeing larger increases among boys than girls. A school-based physical activity intervention program should be adjusted regarding local weather conditions in line with the present findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: children; physical activity level; actigraph; weather conditions; HOPP-study children; physical activity level; actigraph; weather conditions; HOPP-study
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kharlova, I.; Deng, W.H.; Mamen, J.; Mamen, A.; Fredriksen, M.V.; Fredriksen, P.M. The Weather Impact on Physical Activity of 6–12 Year Old Children: A Clustered Study of the Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP). Sports 2020, 8, 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8010009

AMA Style

Kharlova I, Deng WH, Mamen J, Mamen A, Fredriksen MV, Fredriksen PM. The Weather Impact on Physical Activity of 6–12 Year Old Children: A Clustered Study of the Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP). Sports. 2020; 8(1):9. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8010009

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kharlova, Iana; Deng, Wei H.; Mamen, Jostein; Mamen, Asgeir; Fredriksen, Maren V.; Fredriksen, Per M. 2020. "The Weather Impact on Physical Activity of 6–12 Year Old Children: A Clustered Study of the Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP)" Sports 8, no. 1: 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8010009

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