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Skeletal Muscle Myofibrillar Protein Abundance Is Higher in Resistance-Trained Men, and Aging in the Absence of Training May Have an Opposite Effect

1
School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
2
Department of Exercise Science, LaGrange College, LaGrange, GA 30240, USA
3
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine-Auburn Campus, Auburn, AL 36832, USA
4
United States Sports Academy, Daphne, AL 36526, USA
5
School of the Environment, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
6
Translational Science Lab, College of Medicine, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL32306, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 December 2019 / Revised: 3 January 2020 / Accepted: 8 January 2020 / Published: 10 January 2020
Resistance training generally increases skeletal muscle hypertrophy, whereas aging is associated with a loss in muscle mass. Interestingly, select studies suggest that aging, as well as resistance training, may lead to a reduction in the abundance of skeletal muscle myofibrillar (or contractile) protein (per mg tissue). Proteomic interrogations have also demonstrated that aging, as well as weeks to months of resistance training, lead to appreciable alterations in the muscle proteome. Given this evidence, the purpose of this small pilot study was to examine total myofibrillar as well as total sarcoplasmic protein concentrations (per mg wet muscle) from the vastus lateralis muscle of males who were younger and resistance-trained (denoted as YT, n = 6, 25 ± 4 years old, 10 ± 3 self-reported years of training), younger and untrained (denoted as YU, n = 6, 21 ± 1 years old), and older and untrained (denoted as OU, n = 6, 62 ± 8 years old). The relative abundances of actin and myosin heavy chain (per mg tissue) were also examined using SDS-PAGE and Coomassie staining, and shotgun proteomics was used to interrogate the abundances of individual sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins between cohorts. Whole-body fat-free mass (YT > YU = OU), VL thickness (YT > YU = OU), and leg extensor peak torque (YT > YU = OU) differed between groups (p < 0.05). Total myofibrillar protein concentrations were greater in YT versus OU (p = 0.005), but were not different between YT versus YU (p = 0.325). The abundances of actin and myosin heavy chain were greater in YT versus YU (p < 0.05) and OU (p < 0.001). Total sarcoplasmic protein concentrations were not different between groups. While proteomics indicated that marginal differences existed for individual myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins between YT versus other groups, age-related differences were more prominent for myofibrillar proteins (YT = YU > OU, p < 0.05: 7 proteins; OU > YT = YU, p < 0.05: 11 proteins) and sarcoplasmic proteins (YT = YU > OU, p < 0.05: 8 proteins; OU > YT&YU, p < 0.05: 29 proteins). In summary, our data suggest that modest (~9%) myofibrillar protein packing (on a per mg muscle basis) was evident in the YT group. This study also provides further evidence to suggest that notable skeletal muscle proteome differences exist between younger and older humans. However, given that our n-sizes are low, these results only provide a preliminary phenotyping of the reported protein and proteomic variables. View Full-Text
Keywords: sarcoplasmic protein; myofibrillar protein; proteomics; aging; resistance training sarcoplasmic protein; myofibrillar protein; proteomics; aging; resistance training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vann, C.G.; Roberson, P..A.; Osburn, S.C.; Mumford, P.W.; Romero, M.A.; Fox, C.D.; Moore, J.H.; Haun, C.T.; Beck, D.T.; Moon, J.R.; Kavazis, A.N.; Young, K.C.; Badisa, V.L.D.; Mwashote, B.M.; Ibeanusi, V.; Singh, R.K.; Roberts, M.D. Skeletal Muscle Myofibrillar Protein Abundance Is Higher in Resistance-Trained Men, and Aging in the Absence of Training May Have an Opposite Effect. Sports 2020, 8, 7.

AMA Style

Vann CG, Roberson PA, Osburn SC, Mumford PW, Romero MA, Fox CD, Moore JH, Haun CT, Beck DT, Moon JR, Kavazis AN, Young KC, Badisa VLD, Mwashote BM, Ibeanusi V, Singh RK, Roberts MD. Skeletal Muscle Myofibrillar Protein Abundance Is Higher in Resistance-Trained Men, and Aging in the Absence of Training May Have an Opposite Effect. Sports. 2020; 8(1):7.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vann, Christopher G.; Roberson, Paul. A.; Osburn, Shelby C.; Mumford, Petey W.; Romero, Matthew A.; Fox, Carlton D.; Moore, Johnathon H.; Haun, Cody T.; Beck, Darren T.; Moon, Jordan R.; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Young, Kaelin C.; Badisa, Veera L.D.; Mwashote, Benjamin M.; Ibeanusi, Victor; Singh, Rakesh K.; Roberts, Michael D. 2020. "Skeletal Muscle Myofibrillar Protein Abundance Is Higher in Resistance-Trained Men, and Aging in the Absence of Training May Have an Opposite Effect" Sports 8, no. 1: 7.

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