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Open AccessCase Report
Sports 2018, 6(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6020040

Exertional Rhabdomyolysis after an Extreme Conditioning Competition: A Case Report

1
Department of Physical Education, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiabá 78000-000, Brazil
2
Graduation Program on Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia 72000-000, Brazil
3
Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, Faculty Estacio of Vitoria, Vitoria 29000-000, Brazil
4
Undergraduate Program in Medicine, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia 72000-000, Brazil
5
Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 March 2018 / Revised: 7 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
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Abstract

This case report describes an instance of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis caused by an extreme conditioning program (ECP) competition. A 35-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and soreness, which began one day after she completed two days of ECPcompetition composed of five workouts. Three days after competition, creatine kinase (CK) was 77,590 U/L accompanied by myalgia and abnormal liver function tests, while renal function was normal and this resulted in a diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis. A follow-up examination revealed that her serum level of CK was still elevated to 3034 U/L on day 10 and 1257 U/L on day 25 following the ECP competition. The subject reported myalgia even up to 25 days after the ECP competition. Exertional rhabdomyolysis can be observed in ECP athletes following competition and highlights a dangerous condition, which may be increasing in recent years due to the massive expansion of ECP popularity and a growing number of competitions. Future research should investigate the causes of rhabdomyolysis that occur as a result of ECP, especially training methods and/or tasks developed specifically for these competitions. View Full-Text
Keywords: muscle damage; overreaching; extreme conditioning training; creatine kinase; rhabdomyolysis muscle damage; overreaching; extreme conditioning training; creatine kinase; rhabdomyolysis
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Tibana, R.A.; Sousa, N.M.F.; Cunha, G.V.; Prestes, J.; Navalta, J.W.; Voltarelli, F.A. Exertional Rhabdomyolysis after an Extreme Conditioning Competition: A Case Report. Sports 2018, 6, 40.

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