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Evaluation of Fruit Bagging as a Pest Management Option for Direct Pests of Apple

Extension Service, Agriculture and Natural Resources Unit, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
Insects 2018, 9(4), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9040178
Received: 18 October 2018 / Revised: 16 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 1 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pest Control in Fruit Trees)
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Abstract

Bagging fruit with plastic, paper, and two-layer commercial bags was evaluated for control of insect pests and diseases in an experimental apple orchard planted with ‘Red Delicious’ trees. Results from fruit damage evaluations at harvest showed that bagging significantly reduced fruit damage from direct apple pests compared with non-bagged control plots, and generally provided similar levels of fruit protection when compared with a conventional pesticide spray program. Of the three bagging materials evaluated, plastic bags provided numerically higher levels of fruit protection from insect pests, and two-layer commercial bags provided numerically higher levels of fruit protection from fruit diseases. Fruit quality as measured by percentage Brix was higher in non-bagged control plots than all other treatment plots. Fruit quality as measured by fruit diameter was not significantly different among treatments. Plastic and two-layer commercial bags generally required less time to secure around apple fruit than paper bags. The proportion of bags that remained on fruit until harvest ranged from 0.54–0.71 (commercial bags), 0.64–0.82 (plastic bags), and 0.32–0.60 (paper bags), depending on the year. View Full-Text
Keywords: IPM; mechanical control; Halyomorpha halys; Cydia pomonella; Venturia inaequalis; sooty blotch and flyspeck IPM; mechanical control; Halyomorpha halys; Cydia pomonella; Venturia inaequalis; sooty blotch and flyspeck
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Frank, D.L. Evaluation of Fruit Bagging as a Pest Management Option for Direct Pests of Apple. Insects 2018, 9, 178.

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