Next Article in Journal
Utilization of Quercetin as an Oviposition Stimulant by Lab-Cultured Coleomegilla maculata in the Presence of Conspecifics and a Tissue Substrate
Previous Article in Journal
Pheromone-Trap Monitoring System for Pea Leaf Weevil, Sitona lineatus: Effects of Trap Type, Lure Type and Trap Placement within Fields
Article

Identity and Seasonal Abundance of Beneficial Arthropods Associated with Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) in Central Washington State, USA

Department of Entomology, Washington State University, Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center, 24106 North Bunn Road, Prosser, WA 99350, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2018, 9(3), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9030076
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 12 June 2018 / Accepted: 21 June 2018 / Published: 28 June 2018
Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) characterizes and dominates the sagebrush steppe, the largest temperate semi-desert ecosystem in North America. The beneficial arthropod fauna hosted by A. tridentata is poorly known but could be of importance to nearby agriculture seeking to exploit biologically-based pest management. Over four years, we identified and assessed the seasonal abundance of beneficial arthropods (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) associated with A. tridentata during spring to autumn in the Yakima Valley of central Washington using sticky traps. During 2011–2014, 207 sticky traps were placed on non-blooming and blooming A. tridentata plants for a total of 966 trapping days. Overall, across all seasons, we trapped 259.7 beneficial arthropods per trap and 92% of these were parasitoid wasps. Significantly greater numbers of beneficial arthropods were associated with blooming A. tridentata during autumn (410/trap) than non-blooming plants in the spring (181.3/trap) or summer (85.1/trap). Parasitoid wasps and predatory true bugs were most abundant during the autumn, but ladybeetles, lacewings, spiders, bees, and predatory thrips were most common during spring. The association of high numbers of predators, parasitoids, and pollinators with A. tridentata during blooming and non-blooming periods indicates that this plant is an important reservoir of beneficial arthropods in the sagebrush steppe of central Washington. Consequently, biologically-based pest management programs in central Washington may benefit from careful management and retention of A. tridentata plants on crop borders. View Full-Text
Keywords: predators; parasitoids; pollinators; crop pest management; sagebrush steppe; blooming; non-blooming predators; parasitoids; pollinators; crop pest management; sagebrush steppe; blooming; non-blooming
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

James, D.G.; Seymour, L.; Lauby, G.; Buckley, K. Identity and Seasonal Abundance of Beneficial Arthropods Associated with Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) in Central Washington State, USA. Insects 2018, 9, 76. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9030076

AMA Style

James DG, Seymour L, Lauby G, Buckley K. Identity and Seasonal Abundance of Beneficial Arthropods Associated with Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) in Central Washington State, USA. Insects. 2018; 9(3):76. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9030076

Chicago/Turabian Style

James, David G., Lorraine Seymour, Gerry Lauby, and Katie Buckley. 2018. "Identity and Seasonal Abundance of Beneficial Arthropods Associated with Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) in Central Washington State, USA" Insects 9, no. 3: 76. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9030076

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop