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Article

Exceptional Use of Sex Pheromones by Parasitoids of the Genus Cotesia: Males Are Strongly Attracted to Virgin Females, but Are No Longer Attracted to or Even Repelled by Mated Females

Laboratory of Fundamental and Applied Research in Chemical Ecology (FARCE), Institute of Biology, University of Neuchâtel, CH-2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
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Insects 2014, 5(3), 499-512; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects5030499
Received: 25 April 2014 / Revised: 18 June 2014 / Accepted: 20 June 2014 / Published: 30 June 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pheromones and Insect Behaviour)
Sex pheromones have rarely been studied in parasitoids, and it remains largely unknown how male and female parasitoids locate each other. We investigated possible attraction (and repellency) between the sexes of two braconid wasps belonging to the same genus, the gregarious parasitoid, Cotesia glomerata (L.), and the solitary parasitoid, Cotesia marginiventris (Cresson). Males of both species were strongly attracted to conspecific virgin females. Interestingly, in C. glomerata, the males were repelled by mated females, as well as by males of their own species. This repellency of mated females was only evident hours after mating, implying a change in pheromone composition. Males of C. marginiventris were also no longer attracted, but not repelled, by mated females. Females of both species showed no attraction to the odors of conspecific individuals, male or female, and C. glomerata females even appeared to be repelled by mated males. Moreover, the pheromones were found to be highly specific, as males were not attracted by females of the other species. Males of Cotesia glomerata even avoided the pheromones of female Cotesia marginiventris, indicating the recognition of non-conspecific pheromones. We discuss these unique responses in the context of optimal mate finding strategies in parasitoids. View Full-Text
Keywords: parasitoids; mate finding strategy; sex pheromones; repellency; Cotesia glomerata; Cotesia marginiventris; gregarious; solitary parasitoids; mate finding strategy; sex pheromones; repellency; Cotesia glomerata; Cotesia marginiventris; gregarious; solitary
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, H.; Veyrat, N.; Degen, T.; Turlings, T.C.J. Exceptional Use of Sex Pheromones by Parasitoids of the Genus Cotesia: Males Are Strongly Attracted to Virgin Females, but Are No Longer Attracted to or Even Repelled by Mated Females. Insects 2014, 5, 499-512. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects5030499

AMA Style

Xu H, Veyrat N, Degen T, Turlings TCJ. Exceptional Use of Sex Pheromones by Parasitoids of the Genus Cotesia: Males Are Strongly Attracted to Virgin Females, but Are No Longer Attracted to or Even Repelled by Mated Females. Insects. 2014; 5(3):499-512. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects5030499

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Hao, Nathalie Veyrat, Thomas Degen, and Ted C.J. Turlings. 2014. "Exceptional Use of Sex Pheromones by Parasitoids of the Genus Cotesia: Males Are Strongly Attracted to Virgin Females, but Are No Longer Attracted to or Even Repelled by Mated Females" Insects 5, no. 3: 499-512. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects5030499

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