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Article

Japanese Interest in “Hotaru” (Fireflies) and “Kabuto-Mushi” (Japanese Rhinoceros Beetles) Corresponds with Seasonality in Visible Abundance

3-13-29, Takejima, Nishiyodogawa-ku, Osaka, 555-0011, Japan
Insects 2012, 3(2), 424-431; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects3020424
Received: 17 March 2012 / Revised: 31 March 2012 / Accepted: 2 April 2012 / Published: 10 April 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers 2012)
Seasonal changes in the popularity of fireflies [usually Genji-fireflies (Luciola cruciata Motschulsky) in Japan] and Japanese rhinoceros beetles [Allomyrina dichotoma (Linne)] were investigated to examine whether contemporary Japanese are interested in visible emergence of these insects as seasonal events. The popularity of fireflies and Japanese rhinoceros beetles was assessed by the Google search volume of their Japanese names, “Hotaru” and “Kabuto-mushi” in Japanese Katakana script using Google Trends. The search volume index for fireflies and Japanese rhinoceros beetles was distributed across seasons with a clear peak in only particular times of each year from 2004 to 2011. In addition, the seasonal peak of popularity for fireflies occurred at the beginning of June, whereas that for Japanese rhinoceros beetles occurred from the middle of July to the beginning of August. Thus seasonal peak of each species coincided with the peak period of the emergence of each adult stage. These findings indicated that the Japanese are interested in these insects primarily during the time when the two species are most visibly abundant. Although untested, this could suggest that fireflies and Japanese rhinoceros beetles are perceived by the general public as indicators or symbols of summer in Japan. View Full-Text
Keywords: fireflies; Japanese rhinoceros beetles; seasonal interest; the Japanese; popularity; Google Trends; cultural entomology fireflies; Japanese rhinoceros beetles; seasonal interest; the Japanese; popularity; Google Trends; cultural entomology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Takada, K. Japanese Interest in “Hotaru” (Fireflies) and “Kabuto-Mushi” (Japanese Rhinoceros Beetles) Corresponds with Seasonality in Visible Abundance. Insects 2012, 3, 424-431. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects3020424

AMA Style

Takada K. Japanese Interest in “Hotaru” (Fireflies) and “Kabuto-Mushi” (Japanese Rhinoceros Beetles) Corresponds with Seasonality in Visible Abundance. Insects. 2012; 3(2):424-431. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects3020424

Chicago/Turabian Style

Takada, Kenta. 2012. "Japanese Interest in “Hotaru” (Fireflies) and “Kabuto-Mushi” (Japanese Rhinoceros Beetles) Corresponds with Seasonality in Visible Abundance" Insects 3, no. 2: 424-431. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects3020424

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