Next Article in Journal
Nesting, Sex Ratio and Natural Enemies of the Giant Resin Bee in Relation to Native Species in Europe
Next Article in Special Issue
Evaluation of Reference Genes and Expression Level of Genes Potentially Involved in the Mode of Action of Cry1Ac and Cry1F in a Susceptible Reference Strain of Chrysodeixis includens
Previous Article in Journal
Recent Advances in Postharvest Pest Biology and Management
Previous Article in Special Issue
Geographic Monitoring of Insecticide Resistance Mutations in Native and Invasive Populations of the Fall Armyworm
Review

Resistance in the Genus Spodoptera: Key Insect Detoxification Genes

1
Université Côte D’Azur, INRAE, CNRS, ISA, F-06903 Sophia Antipolis, France
2
Institut D’Ecologie et des Sciences de L’Environnement de Paris, Sorbonne Université, CNRS, INRAE, IRD, iEES-Paris, F-75005 Paris, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Béla Darvas
Insects 2021, 12(6), 544; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12060544
Received: 18 May 2021 / Revised: 4 June 2021 / Accepted: 8 June 2021 / Published: 11 June 2021
The moth larvae are among the most damaging pest species on crops worldwide. In this review, we focus on the genus Spodoptera, which can feed on many crops such as rice, cotton or corn. The massive use of insecticides to control these insects has led to the development of resistance. Here, we aim to compare the resistance mechanisms of four species (Spodoptera exigua, Spodoptera frugiperda, Spodoptera littoralis and Spodoptera litura) and highlight the role of enzymes and transporters in resistance to help us understand the molecular basis of their origin.
The genus Spodoptera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) includes species that are among the most important crop pests in the world. These polyphagous species are able to feed on many plants, including corn, rice and cotton. In addition to their ability to adapt to toxic compounds produced by plants, they have developed resistance to the chemical insecticides used for their control. One of the main mechanisms developed by insects to become resistant involves detoxification enzymes. In this review, we illustrate some examples of the role of major families of detoxification enzymes such as cytochromes P450, carboxyl/cholinesterases, glutathione S-transferases (GST) and transporters such as ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in insecticide resistance. We compare available data for four species, Spodoptera exigua, S. frugiperda, S. littoralis and S. litura. Molecular mechanisms underlying the involvement of these genes in resistance will be described, including the duplication of the CYP9A cluster, over-expression of GST epsilon or point mutations in acetylcholinesterase and ABCC2. This review is not intended to be exhaustive but to highlight the key roles of certain genes. View Full-Text
Keywords: resistance; Spodoptera; cytochromes P450; carboxyl/cholinesterases; glutathione S-transferases; ATP-binding cassette transporters resistance; Spodoptera; cytochromes P450; carboxyl/cholinesterases; glutathione S-transferases; ATP-binding cassette transporters
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Hilliou, F.; Chertemps, T.; Maïbèche, M.; Le Goff, G. Resistance in the Genus Spodoptera: Key Insect Detoxification Genes. Insects 2021, 12, 544. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12060544

AMA Style

Hilliou F, Chertemps T, Maïbèche M, Le Goff G. Resistance in the Genus Spodoptera: Key Insect Detoxification Genes. Insects. 2021; 12(6):544. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12060544

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hilliou, Frédérique, Thomas Chertemps, Martine Maïbèche, and Gaëlle Le Goff. 2021. "Resistance in the Genus Spodoptera: Key Insect Detoxification Genes" Insects 12, no. 6: 544. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12060544

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop