Next Article in Journal
Uninterrupted Development of Two Aphid Species Belonging to Cinara Genus during Winter Diapause
Next Article in Special Issue
Pollutants and Their Interaction with Diseases of Social Hymenoptera
Previous Article in Journal
Correction: Hyseni, C.; Garrick, R.C. Ecological Drivers of Species Distributions and Niche Overlap for Three Subterranean Termite Species in the Southern Appalachian Mountains, USA. Insects 2019, 10, 33
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Association between Virus Prevalence and Intercolonial Aggression Levels in the Yellow Crazy Ant, Anoplolepis Gracilipes (Jerdon)
Open AccessArticle

Relish as a Candidate Marker for Transgenerational Immune Priming in a Dampwood Termite (Blattodae: Archeotermopsidae)

1
Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University, 134 Mugar Life Sciences Building, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Biology, Western University, 1151 Richmond St. London, ON N6A 5B7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2020, 11(3), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11030149
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 21 February 2020 / Accepted: 24 February 2020 / Published: 27 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology of Social Insect Diseases)
Natural selection should favor the transfer of immune competence from one generation to the next in a context-dependent manner. Transgenerational immune priming (TGIP) is expected to evolve when species exploit pathogen-rich environments and exhibit extended overlap of parent–offspring generations. Dampwood termites are hemimetabolous, eusocial insects (Blattodea: Archeotermopsidae) that possess both of these traits. We predict that offspring of pathogen-exposed queens of Zootermopsis angusticollis will show evidence of a primed immune system relative to the offspring of unexposed controls. We found that Relish transcripts, one of two immune marker loci tested, were enhanced in two-day-old embryos when laid by Serratia-injected queens. These data implicate the immune deficiency (IMD) signaling pathway in TGIP. Although an independent antibacterial assay revealed that embryos do express antibacterial properties, these do not vary as a function of parental treatment. Taken together, Z. angusticollis shows transcriptional but not translational evidence for TGIP. This apparent incongruence between the transcriptional and antimicrobial response from termites suggests that effectors are either absent in two-day-old embryos or their activity is too subtle to detect with our antibacterial assay. In total, we provide the first suggestive evidence of transgenerational immune priming in a termite. View Full-Text
Keywords: social insect; immunity; embryonic defenses; transgenerational immunity; IMD pathway; gene expression; hemimetabolous; parental effects social insect; immunity; embryonic defenses; transgenerational immunity; IMD pathway; gene expression; hemimetabolous; parental effects
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cole, E.L.; Empringham, J.S.; Biro, C.; Thompson, G.J.; Rosengaus, R.B. Relish as a Candidate Marker for Transgenerational Immune Priming in a Dampwood Termite (Blattodae: Archeotermopsidae). Insects 2020, 11, 149.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop