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Article

Diachasmimorpha longicaudata Parasitism Response to Medfly Host Fruit and Fruit Infestation Age

1
Unidad Asociada de Entomología IVIA-CIB CSIC, Centro de Protección Vegetal y Biotecnología, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias (IVIA), Ctra. Moncada a Naquea km 4.5, 46113 Moncada, Spain
2
High Agronomic Institute of Chott-Mariem, University of Sousse, 4042 Chott-Mariem, Tunisia
3
Instituto Federal Fluminense (IFF), Campus Bom Jesus do Itabapoana, 28360-000 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
4
Unidad de Zoologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca, Spain
5
Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College, University of Dublin, Dublin, Dublin2 D02 VF25, Ireland
6
Integrative Systems Biology group, Institute for Plant Molecular and Cell Biology (IBMCP) from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV), 46022 Valencia, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors should be considered first author.
Insects 2019, 10(7), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10070211
Received: 30 May 2019 / Revised: 15 July 2019 / Accepted: 15 July 2019 / Published: 18 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pest Control in Fruit Trees)
The parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is increasingly being used in integrated pest management (IPM) programs as a biological control agent in order to suppress tephritid fruit flies of economic importance. Innate and acquired behavioral responses—such as pest host fruit preference—of parasitoids can modulate their efficiency in the field and should be taken into consideration prior to parasitoid species’ selection for mass-rearing. We have assessed the influence of medfly-infested (two infestation ages, 1 and 4-d-old) and uninfested fruit species on host preference and efficiency of D. longicaudata by using a multistep assay including olfactory, laboratory and semi-field trials. We found that D. longicaudata was significantly more attracted to medfly-infested apples for both infestation ages, with the oldest being the most preferred. D. longicaudata exhibited a significant preference among the four fruits tested. The implications of these behavioral responses of D. longicaudata to medfly host fruits and infestation age are discussed in relationship to its use in IPM programs in the Mediterranean basin area. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ceratitis capitata; Diachasmimorpha longicaudata; Tephritidae; Braconidae; fruit host cues; host fruit preference; olfactory trials Ceratitis capitata; Diachasmimorpha longicaudata; Tephritidae; Braconidae; fruit host cues; host fruit preference; olfactory trials
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MDPI and ACS Style

Harbi, A.; de Pedro, L.; Ferrara, F.A.A.; Tormos, J.; Chermiti, B.; Beitia, F.; Sabater-Munoz, B. Diachasmimorpha longicaudata Parasitism Response to Medfly Host Fruit and Fruit Infestation Age. Insects 2019, 10, 211. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10070211

AMA Style

Harbi A, de Pedro L, Ferrara FAA, Tormos J, Chermiti B, Beitia F, Sabater-Munoz B. Diachasmimorpha longicaudata Parasitism Response to Medfly Host Fruit and Fruit Infestation Age. Insects. 2019; 10(7):211. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10070211

Chicago/Turabian Style

Harbi, Ahlem, Luis de Pedro, Fernando A.A. Ferrara, José Tormos, Brahim Chermiti, Francisco Beitia, and Beatriz Sabater-Munoz. 2019. "Diachasmimorpha longicaudata Parasitism Response to Medfly Host Fruit and Fruit Infestation Age" Insects 10, no. 7: 211. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10070211

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