Next Article in Journal
A Comparison of Three Approaches for Larval Instar Separation in Insects—A Case Study of Dendrolimus pini
Next Article in Special Issue
Recent Advances in Management by Pheromones of Thaumetopoea Moths in Urban Parks and Woodland Recreational Areas
Previous Article in Journal
Risk and Toxicity Assessment of a Potential Natural Insecticide, Methyl Benzoate, in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.)
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Subset of Odorant Receptors from the Desert Locust Schistocerca gregaria Is Co-Expressed with the Sensory Neuron Membrane Protein 1
Open AccessArticle

Ants Sense, and Follow, Trail Pheromones of Ant Community Members

Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(11), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10110383
Received: 28 September 2019 / Revised: 22 October 2019 / Accepted: 29 October 2019 / Published: 1 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiochemicals and Insect Behavior)
Ants deposit trail pheromones that guide nestmates to food sources. We tested the hypotheses that ant community members (Western carpenter ants, Camponotus modoc; black garden ants, Lasius niger; European fire ants, Myrmica rubra) (1) sense, and follow, each other’s trail pheromones, and (2) fail to recognize trail pheromones of allopatric ants (pavement ants, Tetramorium caespitum; desert harvester ants, Novomessor albisetosus; Argentine ants, Linepithema humilis). In gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection analyses of a six-species synthetic trail pheromone blend (6-TPB), La. niger, Ca. modoc, and M. rubra sensed the trail pheromones of all community members and unexpectedly that of T. caespitum. Except for La. niger, all species did not recognize the trail pheromones of N. albisetosus and Li. humilis. In bioassays, La. niger workers followed the 6-TPB trail for longer distances than their own trail pheromone, indicating an additive effect of con- and hetero-specific pheromones on trail-following. Moreover, Ca. modoc workers followed the 6-TPB and their own trail pheromones for similar distances, indicating no adverse effects of heterospecific pheromones on trail-following. Our data show that ant community members eavesdrop on each other’s trail pheromones, and that multiple pheromones can be combined in a lure that guides multiple species of pest ants to lethal food baits. View Full-Text
Keywords: Lasius niger; black garden ant; Camponotus modoc; Western carpenter ant; Myrmica rubra; European fire ant; trail pheromone; eavesdropping; pheromonal communication; gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection Lasius niger; black garden ant; Camponotus modoc; Western carpenter ant; Myrmica rubra; European fire ant; trail pheromone; eavesdropping; pheromonal communication; gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Chalissery, J.M.; Renyard, A.; Gries, R.; Hoefele, D.; Alamsetti, S.K.; Gries, G. Ants Sense, and Follow, Trail Pheromones of Ant Community Members. Insects 2019, 10, 383.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop