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Opinion

Opinion Piece: Patient-Specific Implants May Be the Next Big Thing in Spinal Surgery

by 1,2,3, 1,4,5 and 1,2,3,*
1
NeuroSpine Surgery Research Group (NSURG), Sydney 2000, Australia
2
Neuro Spine Clinic, Prince of Wales Private Hospital, Randwick 2031, Australia
3
Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney 2000, Australia
4
Surgical and Orthopaedic Research Laboratories (SORL), Prince of Wales Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Randwick 2031, Australia
5
3DMorphic Pty Ltd., Matraville 2036, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Maximilian Rudert and Pedro Berjano
J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11(6), 498; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11060498
Received: 10 April 2021 / Revised: 8 May 2021 / Accepted: 30 May 2021 / Published: 2 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient-Specific Implants in Musculoskeletal (Orthopedic) Surgery)
The emergence of 3D-Printing technologies and subsequent medical applications have allowed for the development of Patient-specific implants (PSIs). There have been increasing reports of PSI application to spinal surgery over the last 5 years, including throughout the spine and to a range of pathologies, though largely for complex cases. Through a number of potential benefits, including improvements to the implant–bone interface and surgical workflow, PSIs aim to improve patient and surgical outcomes, as well as potentially provide new avenues for combating challenges routinely faced by spinal surgeons. However, obstacles to widespread acceptance and routine application include the lack of quality long-term data, research challenges and the practicalities of production and navigating the regulatory environment. While recognition of the significant potential of Spinal PSIs is evident in the literature, it is clear a number of key questions must be answered to inform future clinical and research practices. The spinal surgical community must selectively and ethically continue to offer PSIs to patients, simultaneously allowing for the necessary larger, comparative studies to be conducted, as well as continuing to provide optimal patient care, thereby ultimately determining the exact role of this technology and potentially improving outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: Three-Dimensional Printing (3DP); custom implant; patient-specific implants (PSI); spinal surgery Three-Dimensional Printing (3DP); custom implant; patient-specific implants (PSI); spinal surgery
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MDPI and ACS Style

Amin, T.; Parr, W.C.H.; Mobbs, R.J. Opinion Piece: Patient-Specific Implants May Be the Next Big Thing in Spinal Surgery. J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11, 498. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11060498

AMA Style

Amin T, Parr WCH, Mobbs RJ. Opinion Piece: Patient-Specific Implants May Be the Next Big Thing in Spinal Surgery. Journal of Personalized Medicine. 2021; 11(6):498. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11060498

Chicago/Turabian Style

Amin, Tajrian, William C.H. Parr, and Ralph J. Mobbs. 2021. "Opinion Piece: Patient-Specific Implants May Be the Next Big Thing in Spinal Surgery" Journal of Personalized Medicine 11, no. 6: 498. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11060498

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