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Case Report

Frequency and Clinical Review of the Aberrant Obturator Artery: A Cadaveric Study

1
Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
2
Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diagnostics 2020, 10(8), 546; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10080546
Received: 12 June 2020 / Revised: 12 July 2020 / Accepted: 29 July 2020 / Published: 30 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anatomical Variation and Clinical Diagnosis)
The occurrence of an aberrant obturator artery is common in human anatomy. Detailed knowledge of this anatomical variation is important for the outcome of pelvic and groin surgeries requiring appropriate ligation. Familiarity with the occurrence of an aberrant obturator artery is equally important for instructors teaching pelvic anatomy to students. Case studies highlighting this vascular variation provide anatomical instructors and surgeons with accurate information on how to identify such variants and their prevalence. Seven out of eighteen individuals studied (38.9%) exhibited an aberrant obturator artery, with two of those individuals presenting with bilateral aberrant obturator arteries (11.1%). Six of these individuals had an aberrant obturator artery that originated from the deep inferior epigastric artery (33.3%). One individual had an aberrant obturator artery that originated directly from the external iliac artery (5.6%). View Full-Text
Keywords: aberrant obturator artery; internal iliac branching variations; external iliac branching variations; anatomical variations aberrant obturator artery; internal iliac branching variations; external iliac branching variations; anatomical variations
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MDPI and ACS Style

Granite, G.; Meshida, K.; Wind, G. Frequency and Clinical Review of the Aberrant Obturator Artery: A Cadaveric Study. Diagnostics 2020, 10, 546. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10080546

AMA Style

Granite G, Meshida K, Wind G. Frequency and Clinical Review of the Aberrant Obturator Artery: A Cadaveric Study. Diagnostics. 2020; 10(8):546. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10080546

Chicago/Turabian Style

Granite, Guinevere, Keiko Meshida, and Gary Wind. 2020. "Frequency and Clinical Review of the Aberrant Obturator Artery: A Cadaveric Study" Diagnostics 10, no. 8: 546. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10080546

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