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Fostering a Wildlife-Friendly Program for Sustainable Coffee Farming: The Case of Small-Holder Farmers in Indonesia

1
Nocturnal Primate Research Group, School of Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK
2
Little Fireface Project, Cipaganti, West Java 40131, Indonesia
3
Department of Silviculture, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia
4
Department of Forest Resources Conservation, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Land 2021, 10(2), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020121
Received: 9 December 2020 / Revised: 21 January 2021 / Accepted: 24 January 2021 / Published: 27 January 2021
There is an urgent need for a global transition to sustainable and wildlife-friendly farming systems that provide social and economic equity and protect ecosystem services on which agriculture depends. Java is home to 60% of Indonesia’s population and harbors many endemic species; thus, managing agriculture alongside human well-being and biodiversity is vital. Within a community of ~400 coffee farmers in the province of West Java, we assessed the steps to develop a wildlife-friendly program until reaching certification between February 2019 and October 2020. We adopted an adaptive management approach that included developing common objectives through a process of stakeholder consultation and co-learning. We firstly investigated via interviews the expectations and the issues encountered by 25 farmers who converted to organic production in 2016. Their main expectations were an increase in income and an increase in coffee quality, while they had issues mainly in finding high quality fertilizers, reducing pests, and increasing productivity. We used this information to establish a problem-solving plan for the transition to community-wide wildlife-friendly practices. As part of the adaptive evaluation, we assessed the quality of coffee plantations before and after the implementation of coproduced actions. The quality of coffee significantly improved after our interventions to reduce the coffee berry borer, especially in the fields that started as inorganic and converted to organic. We uncovered additional issues to meet the standards for certification, including banning hunting and trapping activities and increasing coffee quality for international export. We describe the coproduced actions (agroforestry, conservation education, local law, organic alternatives) and phases of the program and discuss the potential barriers. We provide novel evidence of adaptive management framework successfully used to implement management actions and reach shared goals. View Full-Text
Keywords: land sharing; adaptive management; certification; organic; hunting ban; agroforestry; conservation evidence; stakeholders; implementation; co-management land sharing; adaptive management; certification; organic; hunting ban; agroforestry; conservation evidence; stakeholders; implementation; co-management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Campera, M.; Budiadi, B.; Adinda, E.; Ahmad, N.; Balestri, M.; Hedger, K.; Imron, M.A.; Manson, S.; Nijman, V.; Nekaris, K.A.I. Fostering a Wildlife-Friendly Program for Sustainable Coffee Farming: The Case of Small-Holder Farmers in Indonesia. Land 2021, 10, 121. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020121

AMA Style

Campera M, Budiadi B, Adinda E, Ahmad N, Balestri M, Hedger K, Imron MA, Manson S, Nijman V, Nekaris KAI. Fostering a Wildlife-Friendly Program for Sustainable Coffee Farming: The Case of Small-Holder Farmers in Indonesia. Land. 2021; 10(2):121. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020121

Chicago/Turabian Style

Campera, Marco; Budiadi, Budiadi; Adinda, Esther; Ahmad, Nabil; Balestri, Michela; Hedger, Katherine; Imron, Muhammad A.; Manson, Sophie; Nijman, Vincent; Nekaris, K.A.I. 2021. "Fostering a Wildlife-Friendly Program for Sustainable Coffee Farming: The Case of Small-Holder Farmers in Indonesia" Land 10, no. 2: 121. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020121

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