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Insights into Increasing Selenate Reductase Enzyme Activity in the Presence of Nitrogen-Doped Graphite Electrodes for Selenium Effluent Treatment

1
Energy Mining and Environment Research Center, National Research Council of Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6, Canada
2
Aquatic and Crop Resource Development Research Center, National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Dr., Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paola Verlicchi
Water 2022, 14(6), 931; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14060931
Received: 27 January 2022 / Revised: 10 March 2022 / Accepted: 11 March 2022 / Published: 16 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wastewater Treatment Processes)
The weathering of selenium-rich rocks or anthropogenic activities such as mining or smelting can release selenium into the environment, posing a significant environmental risk. The increased monitoring and enforcement of selenium regulations have resulted in protocols to efficiently measure and treat selenium in water and effluent water. The principal aqueous forms of inorganic selenium are selenite (Se(IV)) and selenate (Se(VI)). Selenate, due to its oxy-anionic nature, high mobility, and lack of affinity to conventional adsorbents, is typically more difficult to treat and remove. Thus, it is proposed to remove selenate from water by first reducing it to selenite and then to insoluble elemental selenium, a form that has low toxicity. A naturally occurring selenate reductase enzyme from Thauera selenatis was previously shown to specifically reduce selenate to selenite. To exploit this functionality, recombinant enzyme technologies were used to produce a cell-free, enriched Thauera selenatis selenate reductase heterotrimeric enzyme complex (TsSer-αβγ). The addition of the recombinant enzyme complex to effluent water was found to successfully reduce the selenate. Interestingly, upon adding nitrogen-doped graphite electrodes to the reaction, the selenate-reducing activity significantly increased. Overall, these findings highlight a new, potentially sustainable solution to the reduction of selenate in water and effluent water. View Full-Text
Keywords: N2-doped graphite electrodes; effluent water; selenium; selenate reductase enzymes N2-doped graphite electrodes; effluent water; selenium; selenate reductase enzymes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mohapatra, D.P.; Robinson, K.A.; Huang, F.; Kirpalani, D.; Loewen, M.C. Insights into Increasing Selenate Reductase Enzyme Activity in the Presence of Nitrogen-Doped Graphite Electrodes for Selenium Effluent Treatment. Water 2022, 14, 931. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14060931

AMA Style

Mohapatra DP, Robinson KA, Huang F, Kirpalani D, Loewen MC. Insights into Increasing Selenate Reductase Enzyme Activity in the Presence of Nitrogen-Doped Graphite Electrodes for Selenium Effluent Treatment. Water. 2022; 14(6):931. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14060931

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mohapatra, Dipti Prakash, Kelly Ann Robinson, Fang Huang, Deepak Kirpalani, and Michele Christine Loewen. 2022. "Insights into Increasing Selenate Reductase Enzyme Activity in the Presence of Nitrogen-Doped Graphite Electrodes for Selenium Effluent Treatment" Water 14, no. 6: 931. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14060931

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