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Article

Simulation of Heat Flow in a Synthetic Watershed: Lags and Dampening across Multiple Pathways under a Climate-Forcing Scenario

1
U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Water Science Center, 3209 North Maryland Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA
2
U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Water Science Center, 1 Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53726, USA
3
Eric D. Morway U.S. Geological Survey Nevada Water Science Center, 2730 N. Deer Run Road, Carson City, NV 89701, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Cristina Di Salvo
Water 2022, 14(18), 2810; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182810
Received: 23 June 2022 / Revised: 5 August 2022 / Accepted: 29 August 2022 / Published: 9 September 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Groundwater Hydrological Model Simulation)
Although there is widespread agreement that future climates tend toward warming, the response of aquatic ecosystems to that warming is not well understood. This work, a continuation of companion research, explores the role of distinct watershed pathways in lagging and dampening climate-change signals. It subjects a synthetic flow and transport model to a 30-year warming signal based on climate projections, quantifying the heat breakthrough on a monthly time step along connected pathways. The system corresponds to a temperate watershed roughly 27 km on a side and consists of (a) land-surface processes of overland flow, (b) infiltration through an unsaturated zone (UZ) above an unconfined sandy aquifer overlying impermeable bedrock, and (c) groundwater flow along shallow and deep pathlines that converge as discharge to a surface-water network. Numerical simulations show that about 40% of the warming applied to watershed infiltration arrives at the water table and that the UZ stores a large fraction of the upward-trending heat signal. Additionally, once groundwater reaches the surface-water network after traveling through the saturated zone, only about 10% of the original warm-up signal is returned to streams by discharge. However, increases in the simulated streamflow temperatures are of similar magnitude to increases at the water table, due to the addition of heat by storm runoff, which bypasses UZ and groundwater storage and counteracts subsurface dampening. The synthetic modeling method and tentative findings reported here provide a potential workflow for real-world applications of climate-change modeling at the full watershed scale. View Full-Text
Keywords: heat transport; watershed modeling; temperature; climate change heat transport; watershed modeling; temperature; climate change
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MDPI and ACS Style

Feinstein, D.T.; Hunt, R.J.; Morway, E.D. Simulation of Heat Flow in a Synthetic Watershed: Lags and Dampening across Multiple Pathways under a Climate-Forcing Scenario. Water 2022, 14, 2810. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182810

AMA Style

Feinstein DT, Hunt RJ, Morway ED. Simulation of Heat Flow in a Synthetic Watershed: Lags and Dampening across Multiple Pathways under a Climate-Forcing Scenario. Water. 2022; 14(18):2810. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182810

Chicago/Turabian Style

Feinstein, Daniel T., Randall J. Hunt, and Eric D. Morway. 2022. "Simulation of Heat Flow in a Synthetic Watershed: Lags and Dampening across Multiple Pathways under a Climate-Forcing Scenario" Water 14, no. 18: 2810. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14182810

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