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Article

Development of a Process for Domestic Wastewater Treatment Using Moringa oleifera for Pathogens and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Inhibition under Tropical Conditions

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Laboratoire de Microbiologie Appliquée et de Génie Industriel, Ecole Supérieure Polytechnique, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar-Fann, Dakar 5085, Senegal
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Université de Bordeaux, UF Sciences de la Terre, Allée G. Saint Hilaire, 33615 Pessac, France
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F.-A. Forel Department and Institute of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, 66 Boulevard Carl-Vogt, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
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Bordeaux Imaging Center UAR 3420 CNRS/UB–US 004 INSERM Centre Génomique Fonctionnelle Bordeaux 1er étage–Case 52, 146 rue Léo Saignat, CS 61292, 33076 Bordeaux, France
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Daniel Mamais, Constantinos Noutsopoulos and Athanasios Stasinakis
Water 2022, 14(15), 2379; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152379
Received: 4 June 2022 / Revised: 12 July 2022 / Accepted: 22 July 2022 / Published: 31 July 2022
Developing countries are confronted with general issues of municipal wastewater management and treatment. Untreated wastewater and faecal sludge from septic tanks and traditional toilets are often discharged into rivers and used for urban agriculture without any treatment to minimize potential biorisks. Such practices result in potential environmental and public health risks. In this study, a wastewater treatment plant prototype coupled with Moringa oleifera seeds treatment was developed to evaluate their effectiveness for the reduction of faecal indicator bacteria and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in domestic wastewater. We demonstrated that that the proposed wastewater treatment plant prototype reduces bacteria by 99.34%. A high removal of the bacteria load was obtained after the addition of Moringa oleifera seeds into waters, with removal rates of 36.6–78.8% for E. coli, 28.3–84.6% for faecal coliform, 35.3–95.6% for Vibrio cholera and 32.1–92.4% for total flora. A similar effect of Moringa oleifera seeds was noted for the removal of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, with a removal rate of up to 98% for E. coli and faecal coliform, 100% for Vibrio cholera and 91.96% for total flora. This study demonstrated the high removal efficiency pathogens and antibiotic-resistant bacteria from domestic wastewater using Moringa oleifera seeds. View Full-Text
Keywords: domestic wastewater; biological contamination; wastewater treatment plant; Moringa oleifera; antibiotic resistance domestic wastewater; biological contamination; wastewater treatment plant; Moringa oleifera; antibiotic resistance
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sané, N.; Mbengue, M.; Laffite, A.; Stoll, S.; Poté, J.; Le Coustumer, P. Development of a Process for Domestic Wastewater Treatment Using Moringa oleifera for Pathogens and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Inhibition under Tropical Conditions. Water 2022, 14, 2379. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152379

AMA Style

Sané N, Mbengue M, Laffite A, Stoll S, Poté J, Le Coustumer P. Development of a Process for Domestic Wastewater Treatment Using Moringa oleifera for Pathogens and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Inhibition under Tropical Conditions. Water. 2022; 14(15):2379. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152379

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sané, Nini, Malick Mbengue, Amandine Laffite, Serge Stoll, John Poté, and Philippe Le Coustumer. 2022. "Development of a Process for Domestic Wastewater Treatment Using Moringa oleifera for Pathogens and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Inhibition under Tropical Conditions" Water 14, no. 15: 2379. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152379

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