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Article

Effects of Algae on the Formation of Black Blooms and Bacterial Community Structure Changes in Sediments and Black Floats

1
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
2
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sunny Jiang
Water 2022, 14(15), 2348; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152348
Received: 13 June 2022 / Revised: 17 July 2022 / Accepted: 27 July 2022 / Published: 29 July 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Water Quality and Contamination)
Black bloom is a phenomenon of serious deterioration in shallow-water ecosystems worldwide. This study investigated the effects of algae on the formation of black blooms and the changes of the bacterial community using nearly in-situ cores for a 40-day indoor simulation. We designed experiments with different combinations of water (W), sediments-water (SW), and sediments-water-algae (SWA), and made a comparative analysis of bacterial communities in sediments and black floats. The results demonstrated that the severity of black blooms was considerably affected by the presence of cyanobacteria. The concentration of total nitrates (TN) and NH4+-N in the SWA group increased to 25.1 and 22.47 mg/L (4.05 and 5.5 times of their initial concentrations), respectively. The abundance of microorganisms in the sediments was significantly higher than that of the black floats. The dominant species in both sediments were Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi, whose total proportion exceeded 50%. The addition of algae did not change the dominant community of the sediments. In black floats, the dominant species of the SW group were Proteobacteria (39%) and Actinobacteria (16%), and these of the SWA group were Proteobacteria (38%) and Cyanobacteria (35%). The dominant species in black floats changed significantly. Cyanobacteria increased remarkably in black floats in the group of algae additions. The possible reason may be that the Actinobacteria were suppressed by Cyanobacteria. Therefore, the addition of algae has a significant promoting effect on black blooms and significantly affects the microbial community structure of black floats. View Full-Text
Keywords: black blooms; algae; sediments; black floats; microbial community black blooms; algae; sediments; black floats; microbial community
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tang, T.; Ma, Y.; Shen, W.; Li, Z.; Dai, R.; Ye, J. Effects of Algae on the Formation of Black Blooms and Bacterial Community Structure Changes in Sediments and Black Floats. Water 2022, 14, 2348. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152348

AMA Style

Tang T, Ma Y, Shen W, Li Z, Dai R, Ye J. Effects of Algae on the Formation of Black Blooms and Bacterial Community Structure Changes in Sediments and Black Floats. Water. 2022; 14(15):2348. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152348

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tang, Tingting, Yingxiao Ma, Wendi Shen, Zihao Li, Ruihua Dai, and Jianfeng Ye. 2022. "Effects of Algae on the Formation of Black Blooms and Bacterial Community Structure Changes in Sediments and Black Floats" Water 14, no. 15: 2348. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152348

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