Next Article in Journal
Gastropod Assemblages Associated with Habitat Heterogeneity and Hydrological Shifts in Two Shallow Waterbodies
Previous Article in Journal
Performance of Newly Developed Intermittent Aerator for Flat-Sheet Ceramic Membrane in Industrial MBR System
 
 
Article

Investigation of a Possible Relationship between Anthropogenic and Geogenic Water Contaminants and Birth Defects Occurrence in Rural Nebraska

1
Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-4395, USA
2
Daugherty Water for Food Institute, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA
3
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0340, USA
4
School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0118, USA
5
Child Health Research Institute, Omaha, NE 68198, USA
6
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0531, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Fernando António Leal Pacheco
Water 2022, 14(15), 2289; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152289
Received: 4 July 2022 / Revised: 19 July 2022 / Accepted: 20 July 2022 / Published: 22 July 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Hydrogeology)
Relatively high concentrations of anthropogenic (atrazine and nitrate) and geogenic (uranium and arsenic) water contaminants have been found in drinking water in rural Nebraska. This research assessed a potential association between birth defects occurrence and the contaminants mentioned above within selected Nebraska watershed boundaries. The prevalence of birth defects and the mean concentrations of the selected water contaminants were calculated. More than 80% of Nebraska watersheds had birth defect prevalences above the national average (5 cases per 100 live births). In the negative binomial regression analysis, a positive association was observed between higher levels of nitrate in drinking water and the prevalence of birth defects. Similarly, compared to watersheds with lower atrazine levels, watersheds with atrazine levels above 0.00 µg/L had a higher prevalence of birth defects. This study suggested that chronic exposure to the selected waterborne contaminants even below the legislated maximum contaminant levels may result in birth defects. It also highlighted the relationship between anthropogenic activities (agriculture practices), water contamination, and adverse health effects on children. An additional cohort study is recommended to support these findings so that regulations can be implemented in the form of continuous monitoring of water in private wells and improvements to agricultural practices. View Full-Text
Keywords: birth defect prevalence; atrazine concentration; nitrate concentration; agrichemicals in drinking water; uranium concentration; arsenic concentration birth defect prevalence; atrazine concentration; nitrate concentration; agrichemicals in drinking water; uranium concentration; arsenic concentration
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ouattara, B.S.; Zahid, M.; Rahman, F.I.; Weber, K.A.; Bartelt-Hunt, S.L.; Rogan, E.G. Investigation of a Possible Relationship between Anthropogenic and Geogenic Water Contaminants and Birth Defects Occurrence in Rural Nebraska. Water 2022, 14, 2289. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152289

AMA Style

Ouattara BS, Zahid M, Rahman FI, Weber KA, Bartelt-Hunt SL, Rogan EG. Investigation of a Possible Relationship between Anthropogenic and Geogenic Water Contaminants and Birth Defects Occurrence in Rural Nebraska. Water. 2022; 14(15):2289. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152289

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ouattara, Balkissa S., Muhammad Zahid, Farzana I. Rahman, Karrie A. Weber, Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt, and Eleanor G. Rogan. 2022. "Investigation of a Possible Relationship between Anthropogenic and Geogenic Water Contaminants and Birth Defects Occurrence in Rural Nebraska" Water 14, no. 15: 2289. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152289

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop