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Article

Community-Scale Rural Drinking Water Supply Systems Based on Harvested Rainwater: A Case Study of Australia and Vietnam

School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith 2751, Australia
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Academic Editor: Chicgoua Noubactep
Water 2022, 14(11), 1763; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111763
Received: 30 March 2022 / Revised: 20 May 2022 / Accepted: 27 May 2022 / Published: 30 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Water Futures: Climate, Community and Circular Economy)
Rainwater harvesting (RWH) systems can be used to produce drinking water in rural communities, particularly in developing countries that lack a clean drinking water supply. Most previous research has focused on the application of RWH systems for individual urban households. This paper develops a yield-after-spillage water balance model (WBM) which can calculate the reliability, annual drinking water production (ADWP) and benefit–cost ratio (BCR) of a community-scale RWH system for rural drinking water supply. We consider multiple scenarios regarding community aspects, including 150–1000 users, 70–4800 kL rainwater storage, 20–50 L/capita/day (LCD) drinking water usage levels, local rainfall regimes and economic parameters of Australia (developed country) and Vietnam (developing country). The WBM analysis shows a strong correlation between water demand and water supply with 90% system reliability, which allows both Australian and Vietnamese systems to achieve the similar capability of ADWP and economic values of the produced drinking water. However, the cost of the Vietnamese system is higher due to the requirement of larger rainwater storage due to larger household size and lower rainfall in the dry season, which reduces the BCR compared to the Australian systems. It is found that the RWH systems can be feasibly implemented at the water price of 0.01 AUD/L for all the Vietnamese scenarios and for some Australian scenarios with drinking water demand over 6 kL/day. View Full-Text
Keywords: rainwater harvesting; water balance model; rural community; drinking water production; benefit–cost ratio; water price rainwater harvesting; water balance model; rural community; drinking water production; benefit–cost ratio; water price
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ross, T.T.; Alim, M.A.; Rahman, A. Community-Scale Rural Drinking Water Supply Systems Based on Harvested Rainwater: A Case Study of Australia and Vietnam. Water 2022, 14, 1763. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111763

AMA Style

Ross TT, Alim MA, Rahman A. Community-Scale Rural Drinking Water Supply Systems Based on Harvested Rainwater: A Case Study of Australia and Vietnam. Water. 2022; 14(11):1763. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111763

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ross, Tara T., Mohammad A. Alim, and Ataur Rahman. 2022. "Community-Scale Rural Drinking Water Supply Systems Based on Harvested Rainwater: A Case Study of Australia and Vietnam" Water 14, no. 11: 1763. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111763

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