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Characterizing the Stormwater Runoff Quality and Evaluating the Performance of Curbside Infiltration Systems to Improve Stormwater Quality of an Urban Catchment

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Unisa STEM, Mawson Lakes Campus, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5095, Australia
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Department of Civil Engineering, University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore 54890, Pakistan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Nicola Fontana and Gabriella Balacco
Water 2022, 14(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010014
Received: 6 November 2021 / Revised: 15 December 2021 / Accepted: 20 December 2021 / Published: 22 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Management of Water Distribution Systems)
The conveyance of stormwater has become a major concern for urban planners, considering its harmful effects for receiving water bodies, potentially disturbing their ecosystem. Therefore, it is important to characterize the quality of catchment outflows. This information can assist in planning for appropriate mitigation measures to reduce stormwater runoff discharge from the catchment. To achieve this aim, the article reports the field data from a typical urban catchment in Australia. The pollutant concentration from laboratory testing is then compared against national and international reported values. In addition, a stochastic catchment model was prepared using MUSIC. The study in particular reported on the techniques to model distributed curbside leaky wells with appropriate level of aggregation. The model informed regarding the efficacy of distributed curbside leaky well systems to improve the stormwater quality. The results indicated that catchment generated pollutant load, which is typical of Australian residential catchments. The use of distributed storages only marginally improves the quality of catchment outflows. It is because ability of distributed leaky wells depended on the intercepted runoff volume which is dependent on the hydrological storage volume of each device. Therefore, limited storage volume of current systems resulted in higher contributing area to storage ratio. This manifested in marginal intercepted volume, thereby only minimum reduction in pollutant transport from the catchment to outlet. Considering strong correlation between contributing impervious area and runoff pollutant generation, the study raised the concern that in lieu of following the policy of infill development, there can be potential increase in pollutant concentration in runoff outflows from Australian residential catchments. It is recommended to monitor stormwater quality from more residential catchments in their present conditions. This will assist in informed decision-making regarding adopting mitigations measures before considering developments. View Full-Text
Keywords: stormwater quality; field investigations; stormwater systems; catchment model stormwater quality; field investigations; stormwater systems; catchment model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shahzad, H.; Myers, B.; Hewa, G.; Johnson, T.; Boland, J.; Mujtaba, H. Characterizing the Stormwater Runoff Quality and Evaluating the Performance of Curbside Infiltration Systems to Improve Stormwater Quality of an Urban Catchment. Water 2022, 14, 14. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010014

AMA Style

Shahzad H, Myers B, Hewa G, Johnson T, Boland J, Mujtaba H. Characterizing the Stormwater Runoff Quality and Evaluating the Performance of Curbside Infiltration Systems to Improve Stormwater Quality of an Urban Catchment. Water. 2022; 14(1):14. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010014

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shahzad, Hussain, Baden Myers, Guna Hewa, Tim Johnson, John Boland, and Hassan Mujtaba. 2022. "Characterizing the Stormwater Runoff Quality and Evaluating the Performance of Curbside Infiltration Systems to Improve Stormwater Quality of an Urban Catchment" Water 14, no. 1: 14. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010014

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