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Review

Sugarcane Industrial Byproducts as Challenges to Environmental Safety and Their Remedies: A Review

1
Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800, Pakistan
2
College of Agriculture, Bahadur Sub-Campus Layyah, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800, Pakistan
3
Department of Plant Protection, MNS University of Agriculture, Multan 60000, Pakistan
4
Department of Agriculture, Nutrition, and Food Systems, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The authors have contributed equally, should be considered as the first authors.
Academic Editors: John Zhou and Muhammad Faheem
Water 2021, 13(24), 3495; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243495
Received: 14 November 2021 / Revised: 3 December 2021 / Accepted: 6 December 2021 / Published: 8 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Water and Wastewater)
Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) is one of the major crops cultivated in tropical and sub-tropical countries, and the primary purpose is to obtain raw sugar. It is an important substance for sugar and alcohol production by both the sugar and beverage industries. During cane processing, various byproducts are obtained, namely sugarcane bagasse, bagasse ash, pressmud cake, sugarcane vinasse, and spent wash. There are many challenging problems in storage, and they cause great environmental pollution. This review discusses their properties by which they can be used for cleaner agricultural and environmental sustainability. Utilization of byproducts results in value-added soil properties and crop yield. Replacing chemical fertilization with these organic natured byproducts not only minimizes the surplus usage of chemical fertilizers but is also cost-effective and an eco-friendly approach. The drawbacks of the long-term application of these byproducts in the agricultural ecosystem are not well documented. We conclude that the agriculture sector can dispose of sugar industry byproducts, but proper systematic disposal is needed. The need arises to arrange some seminars, meetings, and training to make the farming community aware of byproducts utilization and setting a friendly relationship between the farming community and industrialists. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar industry; environmental pollution; sustainable productivity; soil properties; environment sustainability sugar industry; environmental pollution; sustainable productivity; soil properties; environment sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Raza, Q.-U.-A.; Bashir, M.A.; Rehim, A.; Sial, M.U.; Ali Raza, H.M.; Atif, H.M.; Brito, A.F.; Geng, Y. Sugarcane Industrial Byproducts as Challenges to Environmental Safety and Their Remedies: A Review. Water 2021, 13, 3495. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243495

AMA Style

Raza Q-U-A, Bashir MA, Rehim A, Sial MU, Ali Raza HM, Atif HM, Brito AF, Geng Y. Sugarcane Industrial Byproducts as Challenges to Environmental Safety and Their Remedies: A Review. Water. 2021; 13(24):3495. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243495

Chicago/Turabian Style

Raza, Qurat-Ul-Ain, Muhammad A. Bashir, Abdur Rehim, Muhammad U. Sial, Hafiz M. Ali Raza, Hafiz M. Atif, Andre F. Brito, and Yucong Geng. 2021. "Sugarcane Industrial Byproducts as Challenges to Environmental Safety and Their Remedies: A Review" Water 13, no. 24: 3495. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243495

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