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Article

Fishing Methods Matter: Comparing the Community and Trait Composition of the Dai (Bagnet) and Gillnet Fisheries in the Tonle Sap River in Southeast Asia

1
Global Water Center and Department of Biology, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV 89557, USA
2
Wonders of the Mekong Project, c/o Inland Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Fisheries Administration, Phnom Penh 12300, Cambodia
3
Marine Science Institute, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
4
Inland Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Fisheries Administration, Phnom Penh 12300, Cambodia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: José Maria Santos
Water 2021, 13(14), 1904; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141904
Received: 2 June 2021 / Revised: 2 July 2021 / Accepted: 5 July 2021 / Published: 9 July 2021
The Tonle Sap Lake and River ecosystem in the Lower Mekong Basin of Southeast Asia is one of the most productive inland fisheries globally but is currently threatened by overfishing, dam construction, and climate change. We compare the catch composition and amount from 2007–2013 of two fishery gear types, the bagnets of the largest commercial fishery, the Dai fishery, and gillnets, which are deployed ubiquitously by independent fishers. We found that the two methods captured a similar number of genera (81 and 88 in the Dai and gillnet). Catches of both fisheries were dominated (>75%) by three genera that migrate longitudinally, Henicorhynchus, Labiobarbus, and Paralaubuca. The catch of the Dai fishery followed annual variation in the flood pulse extent, but the gillnet catch did not. We used resource selection ratios to quantify selection pressure by the gillnet fishery, relative to the Dai fishery, on fish from different genera and trait groups. The gillnet selected for fish that migrate laterally from the floodplain to the main river and for higher trophic level fish. Gillnets may target groups of fish that are less impacted by the long-standing Dai fishery. For both fisheries, we note a need for monitoring fish lengths in order to understand the effects of selection on population dynamics and species-specific trait changes. View Full-Text
Keywords: selection; body size; trophic level; migration; flood pulse; tropical; Mekong; Tonle Sap; resource selection ratios; river flows selection; body size; trophic level; migration; flood pulse; tropical; Mekong; Tonle Sap; resource selection ratios; river flows
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kelson, S.J.; Hogan, Z.; Jerde, C.L.; Chandra, S.; Ngor, P.B.; Koning, A. Fishing Methods Matter: Comparing the Community and Trait Composition of the Dai (Bagnet) and Gillnet Fisheries in the Tonle Sap River in Southeast Asia. Water 2021, 13, 1904. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141904

AMA Style

Kelson SJ, Hogan Z, Jerde CL, Chandra S, Ngor PB, Koning A. Fishing Methods Matter: Comparing the Community and Trait Composition of the Dai (Bagnet) and Gillnet Fisheries in the Tonle Sap River in Southeast Asia. Water. 2021; 13(14):1904. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141904

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kelson, Suzanne J., Zeb Hogan, Christopher L. Jerde, Sudeep Chandra, Peng B. Ngor, and Aaron Koning. 2021. "Fishing Methods Matter: Comparing the Community and Trait Composition of the Dai (Bagnet) and Gillnet Fisheries in the Tonle Sap River in Southeast Asia" Water 13, no. 14: 1904. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141904

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