Next Article in Journal
Land-Use/-Cover Changes and Their Effect on Soil Erosion and River Suspended Sediment Load in Different Landscape Zones of European Russia during 1970–2017
Next Article in Special Issue
Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Concentration on Phragmites australis and Wastewater Treatment Efficiency in Constructed Wetlands
Previous Article in Journal
CFD Modeling of a Stirred Anaerobic Digestion Tank for Evaluating Energy Consumption through Mixing
Previous Article in Special Issue
Using Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids to Enhance Microbial Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Current Understanding and Future Perspectives
Article

Wastewater Treatment and Wood Production of Willow System in Cold Climate

1
Centre for Environmental Biotechnology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research—UFZ, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
2
Department of Technology, Mongolian University of Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar 14191, Mongolia
3
Chair of Urban Water Management and Sanitation, Bauhaus Universität Weimar, 99421 Weimar, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Zhongbing Chen
Water 2021, 13(12), 1630; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121630
Received: 17 May 2021 / Revised: 7 June 2021 / Accepted: 7 June 2021 / Published: 10 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollutants Removal from Wastewater Using Constructed Wetlands)
This article studied how wastewater treatment performance of a short rotation forestry system was influenced by the seasonal operational changes under the extreme Mongolian winter conditions. For this reason, two beds planted with Willow (Salix spec.) and Poplar (Populus spec.) trees were operated over a period of two years under two different seasonal conditions: (A) “external winter storage” and (B) “internal winter storage” of pretreated wastewater. For operational condition A, the tree-bed was loaded with wastewater for only 4 summer months. For this operational condition it was considered that the treatment bed was fed with primary treated wastewater, which was stored in a sealed pond during the remaining 8 months. The other Bed B was irrigated throughout the year (12 months) with the same daily loading rate. In winter, the wastewater accumulated as ice in the tree-bed. Bed A, with external winter storage, showed mass removal percentage up to 95%, while the bed with internal winter storage showed mass removal rates up to 86% for pollutants such as COD, BOD5, TN, and TP. A high yield of biomass was recorded for both beds with slight differences. Based on the results, a design recommendation was developed for full-scale systems of short rotation coppice irrigated with wastewater under various operational conditions, which show these systems to be a viable method for treating wastewater and producing biomass for energy production in Mongolia. View Full-Text
Keywords: wastewater treatment; wastewater reuse; wood production; land application; short rotation coppice; and cold climate wastewater treatment; wastewater reuse; wood production; land application; short rotation coppice; and cold climate
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Khurelbaatar, G.; van Afferden, M.; Sullivan, C.M.; Fühner, C.; Amgalan, J.; Londong, J.; Müller, R.A. Wastewater Treatment and Wood Production of Willow System in Cold Climate. Water 2021, 13, 1630. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121630

AMA Style

Khurelbaatar G, van Afferden M, Sullivan CM, Fühner C, Amgalan J, Londong J, Müller RA. Wastewater Treatment and Wood Production of Willow System in Cold Climate. Water. 2021; 13(12):1630. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121630

Chicago/Turabian Style

Khurelbaatar, Ganbaatar, Manfred van Afferden, Christopher M. Sullivan, Christoph Fühner, Jamsaran Amgalan, Jöerg Londong, and Roland A. Müller 2021. "Wastewater Treatment and Wood Production of Willow System in Cold Climate" Water 13, no. 12: 1630. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13121630

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop