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Open AccessArticle

Learning to Manage Common Resources: Stakeholders Playing a Serious Game See Increased Interdependence in Groundwater Basin Management

1
Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan, 2000 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2
Environmental Defense Fund, 123 Mission St., 28th Floor, San Francisco, CA 94105, USA
3
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan, 735 South State St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
4
Department of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan, 530 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(7), 1966; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071966
Received: 19 May 2020 / Revised: 26 June 2020 / Accepted: 8 July 2020 / Published: 11 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance)
This paper reports an empirical evaluation of a new serious game created to foster learning about collaborative management of common pool resources. Stakeholders (n = 41) involved in the implementation of California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act were recruited to play a new serious game designed to illustrate how alternative water management strategies, including pumping restrictions and simple trading schemes, affect supply. In the game, a group of six players set in a groundwater basin area enact the allocation, needs, and use of water in rounds representing annual seasons. Pre-post surveys found that the gameplay increased perceived interdependence among stakeholders, and optimism about the groundwater management process. Qualitative feedback suggested that participants gained new insights into the nature of common pool resources and the needs of other stakeholders. Serious games may be useful in fostering attitudes, such as interdependence needed for successful collaborative planning and governance. View Full-Text
Keywords: common resource management; serious games; collaborative governance; interdependence; groundwater management; Sustainable Groundwater Management Act common resource management; serious games; collaborative governance; interdependence; groundwater management; Sustainable Groundwater Management Act
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MDPI and ACS Style

Goodspeed, R.; Babbitt, C.; Briones, A.L.G.; Pfleiderer, E.; Lizundia, C.; Seifert, C.M. Learning to Manage Common Resources: Stakeholders Playing a Serious Game See Increased Interdependence in Groundwater Basin Management. Water 2020, 12, 1966. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071966

AMA Style

Goodspeed R, Babbitt C, Briones ALG, Pfleiderer E, Lizundia C, Seifert CM. Learning to Manage Common Resources: Stakeholders Playing a Serious Game See Increased Interdependence in Groundwater Basin Management. Water. 2020; 12(7):1966. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071966

Chicago/Turabian Style

Goodspeed, Robert; Babbitt, Christina; Briones, Ana L.G.; Pfleiderer, Emily; Lizundia, Camilla; Seifert, Colleen M. 2020. "Learning to Manage Common Resources: Stakeholders Playing a Serious Game See Increased Interdependence in Groundwater Basin Management" Water 12, no. 7: 1966. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071966

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