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Open AccessArticle

Long-Term Impacts of Partial Afforestation on Water and Salt Dynamics of an Intermittent Catchment under Climate Change

1
Discipline of Civil Engineering, School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan 47500, Malaysia
2
Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, 23 College Walk, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
3
Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Padova, 35122 Padova, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(4), 1067; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041067
Received: 14 March 2020 / Revised: 7 April 2020 / Accepted: 7 April 2020 / Published: 9 April 2020
Soil salinization is a major environmental issue in arid and semi-arid regions, and has been accelerated in some areas by removal of native vegetation cover. Partial afforestation can be a practical mitigation strategy if efficiently integrated with farms and pastures. Using an integrated surface-subsurface hydrological model, this study evaluates the water and salt dynamics and soil salinization conditions of a rural intermittent catchment in the semi-arid climate of southeast Australia subjected to four different partial afforestation configurations under different climate change scenarios, as predicted by several general circulation models. The results show that the locations of afforested areas can induce a retarding effect in the outflow of groundwater salt, with tree planting at lower elevations showing the steadier salt depletion rates. Moreover, except for the configuration with trees planted near the outlet of the catchment, the streamflow is maintained under all other configurations. It appears that under both Representative Concentration Pathways considered (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5), the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model represents the fastest salt export scheme, whereas the Canadian Earth System Model and the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate represent the slowest salt export scheme. Overall, it is found that the location of partial afforestation generally plays a more significant role than the climate change scenarios. View Full-Text
Keywords: dryland salinity; partial afforestation; climate change; intermittent catchments; MIKE SHE dryland salinity; partial afforestation; climate change; intermittent catchments; MIKE SHE
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MDPI and ACS Style

Daneshmand, H.; Alaghmand, S.; Camporese, M.; Talei, A.; Yeh, P.J.-F.; Daly, E. Long-Term Impacts of Partial Afforestation on Water and Salt Dynamics of an Intermittent Catchment under Climate Change. Water 2020, 12, 1067. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041067

AMA Style

Daneshmand H, Alaghmand S, Camporese M, Talei A, Yeh PJ-F, Daly E. Long-Term Impacts of Partial Afforestation on Water and Salt Dynamics of an Intermittent Catchment under Climate Change. Water. 2020; 12(4):1067. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041067

Chicago/Turabian Style

Daneshmand, Hossein; Alaghmand, Sina; Camporese, Matteo; Talei, Amin; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Daly, Edoardo. 2020. "Long-Term Impacts of Partial Afforestation on Water and Salt Dynamics of an Intermittent Catchment under Climate Change" Water 12, no. 4: 1067. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041067

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