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Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Study the Relief of Lowland River Valleys with a Complex Geological Structure—A Case Study of the Bug River

Department of Water Engineering and Applied Geology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (WULS-SGGW), Nowoursynowska 159 St., 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
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Water 2020, 12(2), 487; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020487
Received: 27 December 2019 / Revised: 4 February 2020 / Accepted: 7 February 2020 / Published: 11 February 2020
River valleys of the Central European Lowlands are the zones of the highest dynamics of morphogenic processes. In the case of areas affected by glacial processes, despite their lowland nature, often they also have a complex geological structure. Sub-alluvial bedrock, composed of erosion-resistant deposits, commonly forms morphological protrusions within them. Their presence significantly affects both the course of flood flows and the valley floor relief. Effective forecasting of fluvial processes in such valley reaches requires conducting research within the entire geomorphologically active zone, both in the channel and the floodplain. The effectiveness of such research should be enhanced by simultaneous use of several different remote sensing methods, including short-range remote sensing. The verification of this hypothesis was the aim of the presented works. Such methods were used in the study of morphodynamics of a Bug valley reach. This area is characterized by a complex geological structure. High-resolution multispectral satellite images (VHRs) and a digital elevation model (DEM) based on aerial laser scanning (ALS) were used to examine the terrain relief. The morphology of the river channel itself was determined based on a series of bathymetric measurements made by a research team. Due to induced climate change and increasing maximum flow values, it can be assumed that the effect of a geological structure in the Central European Lowlands will play an increasing role. The threat and losses associated with floods will also increase. Rational flood prevention requires improvement of remote sensing research methods in lowland river valleys, especially those with complex geological structures. The valley reach presented in this article is an example of such a landform.
Keywords: floodplain; landforms; close-range remote sensing; airborne laser scanning (ALS); bathymetric mapping; sub-alluvial bedrock; Bug River valley floodplain; landforms; close-range remote sensing; airborne laser scanning (ALS); bathymetric mapping; sub-alluvial bedrock; Bug River valley
MDPI and ACS Style

Ostrowski, P.; Falkowski, T. Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Study the Relief of Lowland River Valleys with a Complex Geological Structure—A Case Study of the Bug River. Water 2020, 12, 487.

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