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Review

Biochar as an Eco-Friendly and Economical Adsorbent for the Removal of Colorants (Dyes) from Aqueous Environment: A Review

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Sri Sivasubramaniya Nadar College of Engineering, Kalavakkam, Chennai 603110, Tamil Nadu, India
2
Centre for Waste Management, International Research Centre, Sathyabama Institute of Science and Technology, Jeppiaar Nagar, Chennai 600119, Tamil Nadu, India
3
Department of Separation Science, LUT School of Engineering Science, LUT University, Sammonkatu 12, FI-50130 Mikkeli, Finland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(12), 3561; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123561
Received: 15 November 2020 / Revised: 13 December 2020 / Accepted: 16 December 2020 / Published: 18 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adsorbents for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Resource Recovery)
Dyes (colorants) are used in many industrial applications, and effluents of several industries contain toxic dyes. Dyes exhibit toxicity to humans, aquatic organisms, and the environment. Therefore, dyes containing wastewater must be properly treated before discharging to the surrounding water bodies. Among several water treatment technologies, adsorption is the most preferred technique to sequester dyes from water bodies. Many studies have reported the removal of dyes from wastewater using biochar produced from different biomass, e.g., algae and plant biomass, forest, and domestic residues, animal waste, sewage sludge, etc. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the application of biochar as an eco-friendly and economical adsorbent to remove toxic colorants (dyes) from the aqueous environment. This review highlights the routes of biochar production, such as hydrothermal carbonization, pyrolysis, and hydrothermal liquefaction. Biochar as an adsorbent possesses numerous advantages, such as being eco-friendly, low-cost, and easy to use; various precursors are available in abundance to be converted into biochar, it also has recyclability potential and higher adsorption capacity than other conventional adsorbents. From the literature review, it is clear that biochar is a vital candidate for removal of dyes from wastewater with adsorption capacity of above 80%. View Full-Text
Keywords: adsorption; biochar; dyes removal; wastewater treatment adsorption; biochar; dyes removal; wastewater treatment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Srivatsav, P.; Bhargav, B.S.; Shanmugasundaram, V.; Arun, J.; Gopinath, K.P.; Bhatnagar, A. Biochar as an Eco-Friendly and Economical Adsorbent for the Removal of Colorants (Dyes) from Aqueous Environment: A Review. Water 2020, 12, 3561. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123561

AMA Style

Srivatsav P, Bhargav BS, Shanmugasundaram V, Arun J, Gopinath KP, Bhatnagar A. Biochar as an Eco-Friendly and Economical Adsorbent for the Removal of Colorants (Dyes) from Aqueous Environment: A Review. Water. 2020; 12(12):3561. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123561

Chicago/Turabian Style

Srivatsav, Prithvi; Bhargav, Bhaskar S.; Shanmugasundaram, Vignesh; Arun, Jayaseelan; Gopinath, Kannappan P.; Bhatnagar, Amit. 2020. "Biochar as an Eco-Friendly and Economical Adsorbent for the Removal of Colorants (Dyes) from Aqueous Environment: A Review" Water 12, no. 12: 3561. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123561

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