Next Article in Journal
The Long-Term and Retention Impacts of the Intervention Policy for Cage Aquaculture on the Reservoir Water Qualities in Northern China
Next Article in Special Issue
Managing Stormwater by Accident: A Conceptual Study
Previous Article in Journal
Automated Mapping of Water Table for Cranberry Subirrigation Management: Comparison of Three Spatial Interpolation Methods
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nitrogen Mass Balance and Pressure Impact Model Applied to an Urban Aquifer
Article

Hydrogeological Studies Integrating the Climate, Freshwater Cycle, and Catchment Geography for the Benefit of Urban Resilience and Sustainability

Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(12), 3324; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123324
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 11 November 2020 / Accepted: 19 November 2020 / Published: 26 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Hydrogeology Studies)
Today, there is an increasing need to understand how to link the management of the surface and subsurface to avoid disasters in many urban areas and/or reduce the likelihood of future risks. There is a need for thorough investigation of subsurface processes. This investigation should entail an analysis of water security, flood risks, and drought hazards in urban areas that may affect long-term sustainability and the ability to recover from disturbance, e.g., a capacity for resilience. In this context, as part of this analysis, potential biophysical and hydro-meteorological hazards need to be studied and subdivided according to geological, hydrogeological, man-made, and climatic origin, and by their characteristic temporal scales and site specific characteristics. The introduction of adaptive design and resilience in urban and suburban planning and management requires a shift towards more organic, adaptive, and flexible design and management strategies. This leads to the use of a complex cross-disciplinary methodology. We consider data collation, modelling, and monitoring designed to fit typical urban situations and complexity. Furthermore, implementation of strategic planning, decision-making to manage the consequences of future infrastructure and constructions are considered. The case studies presented are experiences from different hydrogeological studies performed in Odense, Denmark. Rising population and densification is affecting Odense, and there is risk of raised seawater level, groundwater, and surface-water flooding. The anthropogenic modification of subsurface structures and increased climate changes enhance the risk of hazards and the risk of coinciding impacts. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban; resilience; sustainability; hazards; subsurface; water cycle; land-use; infrastructure; planning; catchment; hydrogeology urban; resilience; sustainability; hazards; subsurface; water cycle; land-use; infrastructure; planning; catchment; hydrogeology
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mielby, S.; Henriksen, H.J. Hydrogeological Studies Integrating the Climate, Freshwater Cycle, and Catchment Geography for the Benefit of Urban Resilience and Sustainability. Water 2020, 12, 3324. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123324

AMA Style

Mielby S, Henriksen HJ. Hydrogeological Studies Integrating the Climate, Freshwater Cycle, and Catchment Geography for the Benefit of Urban Resilience and Sustainability. Water. 2020; 12(12):3324. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123324

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mielby, Susie, and Hans J. Henriksen 2020. "Hydrogeological Studies Integrating the Climate, Freshwater Cycle, and Catchment Geography for the Benefit of Urban Resilience and Sustainability" Water 12, no. 12: 3324. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123324

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop