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Advancing Collaborative Water Governance: Unravelling Stakeholders’ Relationships and Influences in Contentious River Basins

1
CSIRO Land and Water, EcoSciences Precinct, 41 Boggo Road, Dutton Park, Brisbane, QLD 4102, Australia
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Fundación CSIRO Chile Research, Avenida Apoquindo 4700, Piso 9, Las Condes, Santiago 7500000, Chile
3
Departamento de Ingeniería Ambiental, Universidad Central, Calle 21 4-40, Bogotá, Colombia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(12), 3316; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123316
Received: 5 November 2020 / Revised: 19 November 2020 / Accepted: 21 November 2020 / Published: 26 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Water Resources Management, Policy and Governance)
Collaborative water governance (CWG) has emerged as a promising framework to tackle water management challenges. Simple identification of participants however is not enough to unravel the intricacies of stakeholders’ interlinkages, roles and influences for robust CWG. A clear understanding of the stakeholders’ landscape is therefore required to underpin CWG. In this work, we combine stakeholder analysis (SA), social network analysis (SNA) and participatory processes (PP) under a theoretical collaborative governance framework to advance CWG in the contentious Rapel River Basin (RRB), Chile. By combining these techniques, we identified a cohort of leading (and secondary) stakeholders, their relationships and critical roles on basin-wide CWG-enabling networks (collaborative ties, information flows and financial exchanges) and their influence to achieve a shared vision for water planning. The results show members of this cohort perform critical roles (bridging, connecting and gatekeeping) across the networks and in influencing explicit elements of the shared vision. Specific CWG-enabling networks properties indicate a weak adaptive capacity of stakeholders to deal with potential water management challenges and strong prospects for sharing innovative ideas/solutions and achieving long-term water planning goals. A major CWG implementation challenge in the RRB is the lack of a leading organisation. One way forward would be formally organising stakeholders of the identified cohort to advance CWG in the RRB. By implementing the methodological framework, we facilitated social learning, fostered trust among stakeholders and mobilised efforts towards implementing CWG in practice in the contentious RRB. View Full-Text
Keywords: water governance; collaboration; social network analysis; participatory process; shared vision; stakeholder analysis; network properties; social learning water governance; collaboration; social network analysis; participatory process; shared vision; stakeholder analysis; network properties; social learning
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rojas, R.; Bennison, G.; Gálvez, V.; Claro, E.; Castelblanco, G. Advancing Collaborative Water Governance: Unravelling Stakeholders’ Relationships and Influences in Contentious River Basins. Water 2020, 12, 3316. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123316

AMA Style

Rojas R, Bennison G, Gálvez V, Claro E, Castelblanco G. Advancing Collaborative Water Governance: Unravelling Stakeholders’ Relationships and Influences in Contentious River Basins. Water. 2020; 12(12):3316. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123316

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rojas, Rodrigo, Gabriella Bennison, Victor Gálvez, Edmundo Claro, and Gabriel Castelblanco. 2020. "Advancing Collaborative Water Governance: Unravelling Stakeholders’ Relationships and Influences in Contentious River Basins" Water 12, no. 12: 3316. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123316

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