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Article

Investigating Monetary Incentives for Environmentally Friendly Residential Landscapes

1
Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, 1095 McCarty Hall B, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
2
Mid-Florida Research and Education Center, Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, 2725 S Binion Road, Apopka, FL 32703, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(11), 3023; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113023
Received: 24 September 2020 / Revised: 21 October 2020 / Accepted: 26 October 2020 / Published: 28 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Environmental Policy and Planning: Land Use and Water)
State and local governments develop policies that promote environmentally friendly landscaping practices with the goal to mitigate adverse environmental impacts from heavily maintained residential lawns. One of the mechanisms to achieve low-input landscaping practices in the urban environment is to promote the conversion of monoculture turfgrass lawns into partial turfgrass, low-input landscapes. Rebate incentives are used as an instrument to encourage the adoption of such landscapes. This study investigates the effects of households’ monetary incentive requirement on households’ preferences and willingness to pay for low-input landscapes. The discrete choice experiment method was used to analyze responses from households categorized into low, medium, and high incentive requirement groups. The results show that rebate incentives may have significant positive effects on individuals’ intentions to adopt low-input landscapes. Participants with low incentive requirement were willing to pay more for environmentally friendly attributes, compared with their counterparts in the medium and high incentive requirement groups. Practical implications for relevant stakeholders are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmentally friendly landscaping; urban environmental policy; water conservation; households’ preferences; rebate incentive; discrete choice experiment; mixed logit model environmentally friendly landscaping; urban environmental policy; water conservation; households’ preferences; rebate incentive; discrete choice experiment; mixed logit model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, X.; Khachatryan, H. Investigating Monetary Incentives for Environmentally Friendly Residential Landscapes. Water 2020, 12, 3023. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113023

AMA Style

Zhang X, Khachatryan H. Investigating Monetary Incentives for Environmentally Friendly Residential Landscapes. Water. 2020; 12(11):3023. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhang, Xumin; Khachatryan, Hayk. 2020. "Investigating Monetary Incentives for Environmentally Friendly Residential Landscapes" Water 12, no. 11: 3023. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113023

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