Next Article in Journal
Stochastic Modelling of Small-Scale Perturbation
Previous Article in Journal
Inexpensive Organic Materials and Their Applications towards Heavy Metal Attenuation in Waters from Southern Peru
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

A Fuzzy Inference System for Seagrass Distribution Modeling in the Mediterranean Sea: A First Approach

Laboratory of Ecological Engineering and Technology, Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, 67100 Xanthi, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(10), 2949; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102949
Received: 18 August 2020 / Revised: 15 October 2020 / Accepted: 17 October 2020 / Published: 21 October 2020
A Mamdani-type fuzzy-logic model was developed to link Mediterranean seagrass presence to the prevailing environmental conditions. UNEP-WCMC (seagrass presence), CMEMS, and EMODnet (oceanographic/environmental) datasets, along with human-impact parameters were utilized for this expert system. The model structure and input parameters were tested according to their capacity to accurately predict the presence of seagrass families at specific locations. The optimum Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) comprised four input variables: water depth, sea surface temperature, nitrates, and bottom chlorophyll-a concentration, exhibiting reasonable precision (76%). Results illustrated that Posidoniaceae prefers cooler water (16–18 °C) with low chlorophyll-a levels (<0.2 mg/m3); Zosteraceae favors similarly cooler (16–18 °C) and mesotrophic waters (Chl-a > 0.2 mg/m3), but also slightly warmer (18–19.5 °C) with lower Chl-a levels (<0.2 mg/m3); Cymodoceaceae lives in warm, oligotrophic (19.5–21.0 °C, Chl-a < 0.3 mg/m3) to moderately warm mesotrophic sites (18–21.3 °C, 0.3–0.4 mg/m3 Chl-a). Finally, Hydrocharitaceae thrives in the warm Mediterranean waters (21–23 °C) of low chlorophyll-a content (<0.25 mg/m3). Climate change scenarios show that Posidoniaceae and Zosteraceae tolerate bathymetric changes, and Posidoniaceae and Zosteraceae are mostly affected by sea temperature rise, while Hydrocharitaceae exhibits tolerance at higher sea temperatures. This FIS could aid the protection of vulnerable seagrass ecosystems by national and regional policy-makers and public authorities. View Full-Text
Keywords: seagrass; fuzzy inference system; modeling; species distribution; Mediterranean Sea seagrass; fuzzy inference system; modeling; species distribution; Mediterranean Sea
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Papaki, D.; Kokkos, N.; Sylaios, G. A Fuzzy Inference System for Seagrass Distribution Modeling in the Mediterranean Sea: A First Approach. Water 2020, 12, 2949.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop