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Article

The Use of Various Rainfall Simulators in the Determination of the Driving Forces of Changes in Sediment Concentration and Clay Enrichment

1
Geographical Institute, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, 1112 Budapest, Hungary
2
Department of Nature Conservation and Landscape Ecology, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Szent István University, 2100 Gödöllő, Hungary
3
Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, 1112 Budapest, Hungary
4
Institute of Geography and Geoinformatics, University of Miskolc, 3515 Miskolc, Hungary
5
Department of Environmental and Landscape Geography, ELTE University, 1117 Budapest, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(10), 2856; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102856
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 8 October 2020 / Accepted: 10 October 2020 / Published: 14 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Water Erosion)
Soil erosion is a complex, destructive process that endangers food security in many parts of the world; thus, its investigation is a key issue. While the measurement of interrill erosion is a necessity, the methods used to carry it out vary greatly, and the comparison of the results is often difficult. The present study aimed to examine the results of two rainfall simulators, testing their sensitivity to different environmental conditions. Plot-scale nozzle type rainfall simulation experiments were conducted on the same regosol under both field and laboratory conditions to compare the dominant driving factors of runoff and soil loss. In the course of the experiments, high-intensity rainfall, various slope gradients, and different soil surface states (moisture content, roughness, and crust state) were chosen as the response parameters, and their driving factors were sought. In terms of the overall erosion process, the runoff, and soil loss properties, we found an agreement between the simulators. However, in the field (a 6 m2 plot), the sediment concentration was related to the soil conditions and therefore its hydrological properties, whereas in the laboratory (a 0.5 m2 plot), slope steepness and rainfall intensity were the main driving factors. This, in turn, indicates that the design of a rainfall simulator may affect the results of the research it is intended for, even if the differences occasioned by various designs may be of a low order. View Full-Text
Keywords: comparability; infiltration; rainfall simulation; runoff; soil erosion comparability; infiltration; rainfall simulation; runoff; soil erosion
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MDPI and ACS Style

Szabó, J.A.; Centeri, C.; Keller, B.; Hatvani, I.G.; Szalai, Z.; Dobos, E.; Jakab, G. The Use of Various Rainfall Simulators in the Determination of the Driving Forces of Changes in Sediment Concentration and Clay Enrichment. Water 2020, 12, 2856. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102856

AMA Style

Szabó JA, Centeri C, Keller B, Hatvani IG, Szalai Z, Dobos E, Jakab G. The Use of Various Rainfall Simulators in the Determination of the Driving Forces of Changes in Sediment Concentration and Clay Enrichment. Water. 2020; 12(10):2856. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102856

Chicago/Turabian Style

Szabó, Judit Alexandra, Csaba Centeri, Boglárka Keller, István Gábor Hatvani, Zoltán Szalai, Endre Dobos, and Gergely Jakab. 2020. "The Use of Various Rainfall Simulators in the Determination of the Driving Forces of Changes in Sediment Concentration and Clay Enrichment" Water 12, no. 10: 2856. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102856

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