Next Article in Journal
Critical Issues Affecting Groundwater Quality Governance and Management in the United States
Next Article in Special Issue
Single Session of Chiseling Tillage for Soil and Vegetation Restoration in Severely Degraded Shrublands
Previous Article in Journal
Decision Support for the Design and Operation of Variable Speed Pumps in Water Supply Systems
Article Menu
Issue 6 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Water 2018, 10(6), 736; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10060736

Plant Harvesting Impacts on Soil Water Patterns and Phenology for Shrub-encroached Grassland

1,2,3
,
1,2,* , 1,2
,
1,2
,
1,2
,
1,2
and
1,2
1
State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
2
School of Natural Resources, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
3
Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 27 May 2018 / Accepted: 29 May 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecohydrology of Woodlands and Savannas)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1930 KB, uploaded 5 June 2018]   |  

Abstract

Harvesting is a common method in grassland management. With shrub encroachment into grassland, special hydrological and physiological dynamics probably occur in the shrub-grass coexisted ecosystem after harvesting, which remains largely unclear. Therefore, this study aims to identify potential effects of harvesting on soil moisture pattern, phenology dynamics, and water utilization in a shrub encroached grassland. We monitored soil water for a year beneath the Caragana microphylla canopy and interspace grassland after harvesting. The results showed that the soil water content increased under shrubs and grass patches after harvesting, especially under later ones. The water storage in soil of 0–100 cm depth increased by 18.9 mm under grass but only 5.5 mm under shrubs. Harvesting also decreased the difference of water storage between shrubs and grass from 19.1 to 5.7 mm. More snowmelt compensation, less evapotranspiration, shorter growing season, and higher water use efficiency may jointly contribute to the water recovery of harvesting soil. This study contributes novel evidence to the ecohydrological impacts of harvesting on shrub-grass co-existed ecosystems, shows application value in controlling shrub encroachment process and provides fundamental insights for the further study on soil water dynamics of similar ecosystems worldwide. View Full-Text
Keywords: Caragana microphylla; soil moisture; water use source; water use efficiency; shrub removal Caragana microphylla; soil moisture; water use source; water use efficiency; shrub removal
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Fan, Y.; Li, X.-Y.; Li, L.; Wei, J.-Q.; Shi, F.-Z.; Yao, H.-Y.; Liu, L. Plant Harvesting Impacts on Soil Water Patterns and Phenology for Shrub-encroached Grassland. Water 2018, 10, 736.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top