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Open AccessArticle

Assessing Urban Water Management Sustainability of a Megacity: Case Study of Seoul, South Korea

1
School of Urban and Civil Engineering, Hongik University, Wausan-ro 94, Mapo-gu, Seoul 04066, Korea
2
Centre for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02792, Korea
3
KWR Watercycle Research Institute, Groningenhaven 7, Nieuwegein 3433 PE, and Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
4
Water Recycle Research Division, Seoul Water Institute, Cheonho-daero 716-10, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 04981, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2018, 10(6), 682; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10060682
Received: 17 April 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges of Water Management and Governance in Cities)
Many cities are facing various water-related challenges caused by rapid urbanization and climate change. Moreover, a megacity may pose a greater risk due to its scale and complexity for coping with impending challenges. Infrastructure and governance also differ by the level of development of a city which indicates that the analysis of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and water governance are site-specific. We examined the status of IWRM of Seoul by using the City Blueprint® Approach which consists of three different frameworks: (1) Trends and Pressures Framework (TPF), (2) City Blueprint Framework (CBF) and (3) the water Governance Capacity Framework (GCF). The TPF summarizes the main social, environmental and financial pressures that may impede water management. The CBF assesses IWRM of the urban water cycle. Finally, the GCF identifies key barriers and opportunities to develop governance capacity. The results indicate that nutrient recovery from wastewater, stormwater separation, and operation cost recovery of water and sanitation services are priority areas for Seoul. Furthermore, the local sense of urgency, behavioral internalization, consumer willingness to pay, and financial continuation are identified as barriers limiting Seoul’s governance capacity. We also examined and compared the results with other mega-cities, to learn from their experiences and plans to cope with the challenges in large cities. View Full-Text
Keywords: Integrated Water Resources Management; water management sustainability; urban resilience; urban water cycle; water governance Integrated Water Resources Management; water management sustainability; urban resilience; urban water cycle; water governance
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Kim, H.; Son, J.; Lee, S.; Koop, S.; Van Leeuwen, K.; Choi, Y.J.; Park, J. Assessing Urban Water Management Sustainability of a Megacity: Case Study of Seoul, South Korea. Water 2018, 10, 682.

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