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Open AccessArticle

Performance of Two Advanced Rainwater Harvesting Systems in Washington DC

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Geosyntec Consultants, Inc., 1330 Beacon Street, Suite 317, Brookline, MA 02446, USA
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Geosyntec Consultants, Inc., 1101 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 450, Washington, DC 20036, USA
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Government of the District of Columbia, Department of Energy & Environment, Watershed Protection Division, 1200 First Street, NE 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20002, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2018, 10(5), 667; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10050667
Received: 29 March 2018 / Revised: 18 May 2018 / Accepted: 20 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are a concern for many cities managing stormwater through combined sewer systems, including the District of Columbia (DC). Advanced rainwater harvesting (ARH) is an innovative approach to managing stormwater and has the potential to minimize CSOs and maximize water conservation. ARH systems use continuous monitoring and adaptive control (CMAC) technology to store or release water from a rainwater harvesting cistern. This study assessed the efficacy of ARH systems to mitigate wet weather discharges at two firehouses in DC. Continuous monitoring data was collected over a period of three years for the systems that were installed in 2012. The collected data indicates that the systems were effective at mitigating wet weather discharges, with average event harvesting rates greater than 95%. These results suggest that if implemented on a larger scale, ARH systems would be a valuable tool in effectively managing stormwater. View Full-Text
Keywords: rainwater harvesting; water conservation; runoff control; green infrastructure; low impact development; adaptive control rainwater harvesting; water conservation; runoff control; green infrastructure; low impact development; adaptive control
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MDPI and ACS Style

Braga, A.; O’Grady, H.; Dabak, T.; Lane, C. Performance of Two Advanced Rainwater Harvesting Systems in Washington DC. Water 2018, 10, 667.

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