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Open AccessArticle

What Participation? Distinguishing Water Monitoring Programs in Mining Regions Based on Community Participation

1
Centro de Estudios del Desarrollo Regional y Políticas Públicas, Universidad de los Lagos, Osorno 5310887, Chile
2
School of Community and Regional Planning, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2, Canada
3
Norman B. Keevil Institute of Mining Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
4
UBC School of Public Policy and Global Affairs, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
5
Canadian International Resources and Development Institute (CIRDI), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6E 3Z3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2018, 10(10), 1325; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10101325
Received: 19 July 2018 / Revised: 19 September 2018 / Accepted: 21 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Stewardship in Mining Regions)
Water issues are a major concern for the mining sector and for communities living near mining operations. Water-related conflicts can damage a firm’s social license to operate while violent conflicts pose devastating impacts on community well-being. Collaborative approaches to water management are gaining attention as a proactive solution to prevent conflict. One manifestation of these efforts is participatory water monitoring (PWM). PWM programs have the potential to generate new scientific information on water quantity and quality, improve scientific literacy, generate trust among stakeholders, improve water resource management and ultimately mitigate conflict. The emergence of PWM programs signals a shift toward greater stakeholder collaboration and more inclusive water governance within mining regions. In this article, we propose a new framework to evaluate the degree and extent of community involvement in PWM programs. This framework builds on citizen science literature. When applied to 20 cases in Latin America, notable differences in the degree of community and company participation between PWM programs are found. These differences suggest that companies and communities approach these programs from very different points of view. It is concluded that more attentive collaboration between firms and communities in the design of the program, the collection of data and interpretation of the results is needed to effectively build trust through PWM. View Full-Text
Keywords: water monitoring; mining; participation; citizen science; Latin America water monitoring; mining; participation; citizen science; Latin America
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pareja, C.; Honey-Rosés, J.; Kunz, N.C.; Fraser, J.; Xavier, A. What Participation? Distinguishing Water Monitoring Programs in Mining Regions Based on Community Participation. Water 2018, 10, 1325. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10101325

AMA Style

Pareja C, Honey-Rosés J, Kunz NC, Fraser J, Xavier A. What Participation? Distinguishing Water Monitoring Programs in Mining Regions Based on Community Participation. Water. 2018; 10(10):1325. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10101325

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pareja, Claudio; Honey-Rosés, Jordi; Kunz, Nadja C.; Fraser, Jocelyn; Xavier, André. 2018. "What Participation? Distinguishing Water Monitoring Programs in Mining Regions Based on Community Participation" Water 10, no. 10: 1325. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10101325

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