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Pollution Characteristics and Policy Actions on Fine Particulate Matter in a Growing Asian Economy: The Case of Bangkok Metropolitan Region

1
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan
2
JICA Research Institute, Tokyo 162-8433, Japan
3
Kiel Institute for the World Economy, 24105 Kiel, Germany
4
Environmental Engineering and Management Program, School of Environment, Resources and Development, Asian Institute of Technology, Klongluang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
5
Asia Center for Air Pollution Research, 1182 Sowa, Nishi-ku, Niigata City 950-2144, Japan
6
Institut Teknologi Nasional Bandung (ITENAS), Bandung 40124, Indonesia
7
Pollution Control Department (PCD), Bangkok 10400, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(5), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10050227
Received: 18 March 2019 / Revised: 19 April 2019 / Accepted: 22 April 2019 / Published: 27 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Quality in the Asia-Pacific Region)
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Abstract

Air pollution is becoming a prominent social problem in fast-growing Asian economies. Taking the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) as a case, we conducted an observational study of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and acid deposition, consisting of their continuous monitoring at two sites. To find the major contributing sources of PM2.5, the PM composition data were analyzed by a receptor modeling approach while the pollution load from BMR sources to the air was characterized by an emission inventory. Our data show generally alarming levels of PM2.5 in the region, of which transportation and biomass burning are two major sources. In this paper, we present a general overview of our observational findings, contrast the scientific information with the policy context of air quality management in BMR, and discuss policy implications. In BMR, where a set of conventional regulatory instruments on air quality management are already in place, a solution for the air pollution problem should lie in a combination of air quality regulation and other policies, such as energy and agricultural policies. View Full-Text
Keywords: fine particulate matter (PM2.5); Bangkok Metropolitan Region; Thailand; air quality management; acid deposition fine particulate matter (PM2.5); Bangkok Metropolitan Region; Thailand; air quality management; acid deposition
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Narita, D.; Oanh, N.T.K.; Sato, K.; Huo, M.; Permadi, D.A.; Chi, N.N.H.; Ratanajaratroj, T.; Pawarmart, I. Pollution Characteristics and Policy Actions on Fine Particulate Matter in a Growing Asian Economy: The Case of Bangkok Metropolitan Region. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 227.

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