Next Article in Journal
Dynamin-Related Protein 1 at the Crossroads of Cancer
Next Article in Special Issue
Cell-Free Approaches in Synthetic Biology Utilizing Microfluidics
Previous Article in Journal
Biofilm Formation by the Acidophile Bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans Involves c-di-GMP Pathway and Pel exopolysaccharide
Previous Article in Special Issue
Microfluidic Devices for Drug Delivery Systems and Drug Screening
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Genes 2018, 9(2), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes9020114

Skin-on-a-Chip: Transepithelial Electrical Resistance and Extracellular Acidification Measurements through an Automated Air-Liquid Interface

1
cellasys GmbH, 87758 Kronburg, Germany
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, 80333 Munich, Germany
3
Centre in Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, 4059 Kelvin Grove, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 15 February 2018 / Accepted: 16 February 2018 / Published: 21 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From the Lab-on-a-Chip to the Organ-on-a-Chip)
Full-Text   |   PDF [2042 KB, uploaded 23 February 2018]   |  

Abstract

Skin is a critical organ that plays a crucial role in defending the internal organs of the body. For this reason, extensive work has gone into creating artificial models of the epidermis for in vitro skin toxicity tests. These tissue models, called reconstructed human epidermis (RhE), are used by researchers in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and environmental arenas to evaluate skin toxicity upon exposure to xenobiotics. Here, we present a label-free solution that leverages the use of the intelligent mobile lab for in vitro diagnostics (IMOLA-IVD), a noninvasive, sensor-based platform, to monitor the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of RhE models and adherent cells cultured on porous membrane inserts. Murine fibroblasts cultured on polycarbonate membranes were first used as a test model to optimize procedures using a custom BioChip encapsulation design, as well as dual fluidic configurations, for continuous and automated perfusion of membrane-bound cultures. Extracellular acidification rate (EAR) and TEER of membrane-bound L929 cells were monitored. The developed protocol was then used to monitor the TEER of MatTek EpiDermTM RhE models over a period of 48 h. TEER and EAR measurements demonstrated that the designed system is capable of maintaining stable cultures on the chip, monitoring metabolic parameters, and revealing tissue breakdown over time. View Full-Text
Keywords: TEER; Organ-on-a-Chip; skin models; reconstructed human epidermis; impedance; label-free monitoring TEER; Organ-on-a-Chip; skin models; reconstructed human epidermis; impedance; label-free monitoring
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Alexander, F.A., Jr.; Eggert, S.; Wiest, J. Skin-on-a-Chip: Transepithelial Electrical Resistance and Extracellular Acidification Measurements through an Automated Air-Liquid Interface. Genes 2018, 9, 114.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Genes EISSN 2073-4425 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top