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Article

Toxoplasma gondii Seropositivity Interacts with Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val105/158Met Variation Increasing the Risk of Schizophrenia

1
Instituto de Neurociencias, Centro de Investigación Biomédica (CIBM), Universidad de Granada, 18016 Granada, Spain
2
Departamento de Psiquiatría, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Granada, 18016 Granada, Spain
3
Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.Granada, 18012 Granada, Spain
4
Vicerectorat de Recerca, Investigadora postdoctoral Margarita Salas, Universitat de Barcelona, 08007 Barcelona, Spain
5
Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Granada, 18016 Granada, Spain
6
Departamento de Enfermería, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
7
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
8
Unidad de Investigación en Discapacidad Intelectual y Trastornos del Desarrollo (UNIVIDD), Fundació Villablanca, IISPV, Departamento de Psicología, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), 43007 Reus, Spain
9
Department of Psychology, State University of New York at Plattsburgh, Plattsburgh, 12901 NY, USA
10
Secció de Zoologia i Antropologia Biològica, Departament de Biologia Evolutiva, Ecologia i Ciències Ambientals, Facultat de Biologia, Institut de Biomedicina de la Universitat de Barcelona (IBUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Diego Centonze
Genes 2022, 13(6), 1088; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13061088
Received: 31 May 2022 / Revised: 15 June 2022 / Accepted: 16 June 2022 / Published: 18 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Genetics of Psychiatric Disorders)
Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous and severe psychotic disorder. Epidemiological findings have suggested that the exposure to infectious agents such as Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is associated with an increased risk for schizophrenia. On the other hand, there is evidence involving the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val105/158Met polymorphism in the aetiology of schizophrenia since it alters the dopamine metabolism. A case–control study of 141 patients and 142 controls was conducted to analyse the polymorphism, the prevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG, and their interaction on the risk for schizophrenia. IgG were detected by ELISA, and genotyping was performed with TaqMan Real-Time PCR. Although no association was found between any COMT genotype and schizophrenia, we found a significant association between T. gondii seropositivity and the disorder (χ2 = 11.71; p-value < 0.001). Furthermore, the risk for schizophrenia conferred by T. gondii was modified by the COMT genotype, with those who had been exposed to the infection showing a different risk compared to that of nonexposed ones depending on the COMT genotype (χ2 for the interaction = 7.28, p-value = 0.007). This study provides evidence that the COMT genotype modifies the risk for schizophrenia conferred by T. gondii infection, with it being higher in those individuals with the Met/Met phenotype, intermediate in heterozygous, and lower in those with the Val/Val phenotype. View Full-Text
Keywords: COMT; Toxoplasma gondii; gene–environment interaction; schizophrenia; infectious agents; case–control study COMT; Toxoplasma gondii; gene–environment interaction; schizophrenia; infectious agents; case–control study
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rovira, P.; Gutiérrez, B.; Sorlózano-Puerto, A.; Gutiérrez-Fernández, J.; Molina, E.; Rivera, M.; Martínez-Leal, R.; Ibanez-Casas, I.; Martín-Laguna, M.V.; Rosa, A.; Torres-González, F.; Cervilla, J.A. Toxoplasma gondii Seropositivity Interacts with Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val105/158Met Variation Increasing the Risk of Schizophrenia. Genes 2022, 13, 1088. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13061088

AMA Style

Rovira P, Gutiérrez B, Sorlózano-Puerto A, Gutiérrez-Fernández J, Molina E, Rivera M, Martínez-Leal R, Ibanez-Casas I, Martín-Laguna MV, Rosa A, Torres-González F, Cervilla JA. Toxoplasma gondii Seropositivity Interacts with Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val105/158Met Variation Increasing the Risk of Schizophrenia. Genes. 2022; 13(6):1088. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13061088

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rovira, Paula, Blanca Gutiérrez, Antonio Sorlózano-Puerto, José Gutiérrez-Fernández, Esther Molina, Margarita Rivera, Rafael Martínez-Leal, Inmaculada Ibanez-Casas, María Victoria Martín-Laguna, Araceli Rosa, Francisco Torres-González, and Jorge A. Cervilla. 2022. "Toxoplasma gondii Seropositivity Interacts with Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val105/158Met Variation Increasing the Risk of Schizophrenia" Genes 13, no. 6: 1088. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes13061088

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