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Article

Benefits of Exome Sequencing in Children with Suspected Isolated Hearing Loss

1
Division of Genetic Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
2
Ear-Nose-Throat/Head and Neck Surgery Division, Geneva University Hospitals, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Shawn Burgess
Genes 2021, 12(8), 1277; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12081277
Received: 9 July 2021 / Revised: 3 August 2021 / Accepted: 18 August 2021 / Published: 20 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Epigenetics of Hearing Loss)
Purpose: Hearing loss is characterized by an extensive genetic heterogeneity and remains a common disorder in children. Molecular diagnosis is of particular benefit in children, and permits the early identification of clinically-unrecognized hearing loss syndromes, which permits effective clinical management and follow-up, including genetic counselling. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing with the analysis of a panel of 189 genes associated with hearing loss in a prospective cohort of 61 children and 9 adults presenting mainly with isolated hearing loss. Results: The overall diagnostic rate using exome sequencing was 47.2% (52.5% in children; 22% in adults). In children with confirmed molecular results, 17/32 (53.2%) showed autosomal recessive inheritance patterns, 14/32 (43.75%) showed an autosomal dominant condition, and one case had X-linked hearing loss. In adults, the two patients showed an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Among the 32 children, 17 (53.1%) had nonsyndromic hearing loss and 15 (46.7%) had syndromic hearing loss. One adult was diagnosed with syndromic hearing loss and one with nonsyndromic hearing loss. The most common causative genes were STRC (5 cases), GJB2 (3 cases), COL11A1 (3 cases), and ACTG1 (3 cases). Conclusions: Exome sequencing has a high diagnostic yield in children with hearing loss and can reveal a syndromic hearing loss form before other organs/systems become involved, allowing the surveillance of unrecognized present and/or future complications associated with these syndromes. View Full-Text
Keywords: isolated hearing loss; deafness; genetics; molecular diagnosis; children; whole-exome sequencing isolated hearing loss; deafness; genetics; molecular diagnosis; children; whole-exome sequencing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Van Heurck, R.; Carminho-Rodrigues, M.T.; Ranza, E.; Stafuzza, C.; Quteineh, L.; Gehrig, C.; Hammar, E.; Guipponi, M.; Abramowicz, M.; Senn, P.; Guinand, N.; Cao-Van, H.; Paoloni-Giacobino, A. Benefits of Exome Sequencing in Children with Suspected Isolated Hearing Loss. Genes 2021, 12, 1277. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12081277

AMA Style

Van Heurck R, Carminho-Rodrigues MT, Ranza E, Stafuzza C, Quteineh L, Gehrig C, Hammar E, Guipponi M, Abramowicz M, Senn P, Guinand N, Cao-Van H, Paoloni-Giacobino A. Benefits of Exome Sequencing in Children with Suspected Isolated Hearing Loss. Genes. 2021; 12(8):1277. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12081277

Chicago/Turabian Style

Van Heurck, Roxane, Maria T. Carminho-Rodrigues, Emmanuelle Ranza, Caterina Stafuzza, Lina Quteineh, Corinne Gehrig, Eva Hammar, Michel Guipponi, Marc Abramowicz, Pascal Senn, Nils Guinand, Helene Cao-Van, and Ariane Paoloni-Giacobino. 2021. "Benefits of Exome Sequencing in Children with Suspected Isolated Hearing Loss" Genes 12, no. 8: 1277. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12081277

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