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Review

Omics Application in Animal Science—A Special Emphasis on Stress Response and Damaging Behaviour in Pigs

1
Swine Research Unit, Agroscope, La Tioleyre 4, 1725 Posieux, Switzerland
2
Departamento de Ciências e Engenharia de Biosistemas, Instituto Superior d’Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal
3
Génétique Physiologie et Systèmes d’Elevage (GenPhySE), INRA, 24 chemin de Borde-Rouge-Auzeville Tolosane, 31326 Castanet Tolosan, France
4
Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology (FBN), Institute of Genome Biology, Genomics Unit, Wilhelm-Stahl-Allee 2, 18196 Dummerstorf, Germany
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2020, 11(8), 920; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11080920
Received: 22 July 2020 / Revised: 6 August 2020 / Accepted: 7 August 2020 / Published: 11 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Genomics Applied to Livestock Production)
Increasing stress resilience of livestock is important for ethical and profitable meat and dairy production. Susceptibility to stress can entail damaging behaviours, a common problem in pig production. Breeding animals with increased stress resilience is difficult for various reasons. First, studies on neuroendocrine and behavioural stress responses in farm animals are scarce, as it is difficult to record adequate phenotypes under field conditions. Second, damaging behaviours and stress susceptibility are complex traits, and their biology is not yet well understood. Dissecting complex traits into biologically better defined, heritable and easily measurable proxy traits and developing biomarkers will facilitate recording these traits in large numbers. High-throughput molecular technologies (“omics”) study the entirety of molecules and their interactions in a single analysis step. They can help to decipher the contributions of different physiological systems and identify candidate molecules that are representative of different physiological pathways. Here, we provide a general overview of different omics approaches and we give examples of how these techniques could be applied to discover biomarkers. We discuss the genetic dissection of the stress response by different omics techniques and we provide examples and outline potential applications of omics tools to understand and prevent outbreaks of damaging behaviours. View Full-Text
Keywords: genomics; epigenomics; transcriptomics; proteomics; metabolomics; biomarkers; swine; animal welfare; damaging behaviour genomics; epigenomics; transcriptomics; proteomics; metabolomics; biomarkers; swine; animal welfare; damaging behaviour
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kasper, C.; Ribeiro, D.; Almeida, A.M.d.; Larzul, C.; Liaubet, L.; Murani, E. Omics Application in Animal Science—A Special Emphasis on Stress Response and Damaging Behaviour in Pigs. Genes 2020, 11, 920. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11080920

AMA Style

Kasper C, Ribeiro D, Almeida AMd, Larzul C, Liaubet L, Murani E. Omics Application in Animal Science—A Special Emphasis on Stress Response and Damaging Behaviour in Pigs. Genes. 2020; 11(8):920. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11080920

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kasper, Claudia, David Ribeiro, André M.d. Almeida, Catherine Larzul, Laurence Liaubet, and Eduard Murani. 2020. "Omics Application in Animal Science—A Special Emphasis on Stress Response and Damaging Behaviour in Pigs" Genes 11, no. 8: 920. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11080920

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