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Perspective

Origins and Consequences of Chromosomal Instability: From Cellular Adaptation to Genome Chaos-Mediated System Survival

1
The Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2
Center for Molecular Medicine and Genomics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
3
Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2020, 11(10), 1162; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11101162
Received: 22 August 2020 / Revised: 22 September 2020 / Accepted: 29 September 2020 / Published: 30 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Triggering Forces of Chromosome Instability)
When discussing chromosomal instability, most of the literature focuses on the characterization of individual molecular mechanisms. These studies search for genomic and environmental causes and consequences of chromosomal instability in cancer, aiming to identify key triggering factors useful to control chromosomal instability and apply this knowledge in the clinic. Since cancer is a phenomenon of new system emergence from normal tissue driven by somatic evolution, such studies should be done in the context of new genome system emergence during evolution. In this perspective, both the origin and key outcome of chromosomal instability are examined using the genome theory of cancer evolution. Specifically, chromosomal instability was linked to a spectrum of genomic and non-genomic variants, from epigenetic alterations to drastic genome chaos. These highly diverse factors were then unified by the evolutionary mechanism of cancer. Following identification of the hidden link between cellular adaptation (positive and essential) and its trade-off (unavoidable and negative) of chromosomal instability, why chromosomal instability is the main player in the macro-cellular evolution of cancer is briefly discussed. Finally, new research directions are suggested, including searching for a common mechanism of evolutionary phase transition, establishing chromosomal instability as an evolutionary biomarker, validating the new two-phase evolutionary model of cancer, and applying such a model to improve clinical outcomes and to understand the genome-defined mechanism of organismal evolution. View Full-Text
Keywords: chromosome instability (CIN); fuzzy inheritance; genome theory; karyotype coding; two phases of cancer evolution chromosome instability (CIN); fuzzy inheritance; genome theory; karyotype coding; two phases of cancer evolution
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ye, C.J.; Sharpe, Z.; Heng, H.H. Origins and Consequences of Chromosomal Instability: From Cellular Adaptation to Genome Chaos-Mediated System Survival. Genes 2020, 11, 1162. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11101162

AMA Style

Ye CJ, Sharpe Z, Heng HH. Origins and Consequences of Chromosomal Instability: From Cellular Adaptation to Genome Chaos-Mediated System Survival. Genes. 2020; 11(10):1162. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11101162

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ye, Christine J.; Sharpe, Zachary; Heng, Henry H. 2020. "Origins and Consequences of Chromosomal Instability: From Cellular Adaptation to Genome Chaos-Mediated System Survival" Genes 11, no. 10: 1162. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11101162

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