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Open AccessArticle

Characteristics of the IVF Cycle that Contribute to the Incidence of Mosaicism

1
Preimplantation Genetic Testing Department, Igenomix, 46980 Valencia, Spain
2
Functional Genomix & Bioinformatics Lab, Igenomix, 46980 Valencia, Spain
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Valencia/Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria (INCLIVA), 46016 Valencia, Spain
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
6
Head of Scientific Advisory Board, Igenomix and Igenomix Foundation, 46980 Valencia, Spain
7
Research & Development Department, Igenomix and Igenomix Foundation, 46980 Valencia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2020, 11(10), 1151; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11101151
Received: 18 August 2020 / Revised: 21 September 2020 / Accepted: 26 September 2020 / Published: 30 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue EmbryoGenetics)
Highly sensitive next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms applied to preimplantation genetic testing for aneuploidy (PGT-A) allow the classification of mosaicism in trophectoderm biopsies. However, the incidence of mosaicism reported by these tests can be affected by a wide number of analytical, biological, and clinical factors. With the use of a proprietary algorithm for automated diagnosis of aneuploidy and mosaicism, we retrospectively analyzed a large series of 115,368 trophectoderm biopsies from 27,436 PGT-A cycles to determine whether certain biological factors and in vitro fertilization (IVF) practices influence the incidence of overall aneuploidy, whole uniform aneuploidy, mosaicism, and TE biopsies with only segmental aneuploidy. Older female and male patients showed higher rates of high-mosaic degree and whole uniform aneuploidies and severe oligozoospermic patients had higher rates of mosaicism and only segmental aneuploidies. Logistic regression analysis identified a positive effect of female age but a negative effect of embryo vitrification on the incidence of overall aneuploid embryos. Female age increased whole uniform aneuploidy rates but decreased only segmental aneuploidy and mosaicism, mainly low-mosaics. Conversely, higher ovarian response decreased whole uniform aneuploidy rates but increased only segmental aneuploidies. Finally, embryo vitrification decreased whole uniform aneuploidy rates but increased mosaicism, mainly low-mosaics, compared to PGT-A cycles with fresh oocytes. These results could be useful for clinician’s management of the IVF cycles. View Full-Text
Keywords: PGT-A; NGS; aneuploidy; mosaicism; segmental; vitrification; ovarian response; female age PGT-A; NGS; aneuploidy; mosaicism; segmental; vitrification; ovarian response; female age
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Rodrigo, L.; Clemente-Císcar, M.; Campos-Galindo, I.; Peinado, V.; Simón, C.; Rubio, C. Characteristics of the IVF Cycle that Contribute to the Incidence of Mosaicism. Genes 2020, 11, 1151.

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