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Open AccessReview

Functional Proteomics of Nuclear Proteins in Tetrahymena thermophila: A Review

1
Department of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada
2
Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, 1 King’s College Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
3
Department of Biology, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
4
Department of Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Centre, Université Laval, Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
5
CHU de Québec Research Center, CHUL, 2705 Boulevard Laurier, Quebec, QC G1V 4G2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2019, 10(5), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10050333
Received: 27 March 2019 / Revised: 23 April 2019 / Accepted: 25 April 2019 / Published: 1 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ciliate Genetics and Epigenetics)
Identification and characterization of protein complexes and interactomes has been essential to the understanding of fundamental nuclear processes including transcription, replication, recombination, and maintenance of genome stability. Despite significant progress in elucidation of nuclear proteomes and interactomes of organisms such as yeast and mammalian systems, progress in other models has lagged. Protists, including the alveolate ciliate protozoa with Tetrahymena thermophila as one of the most studied members of this group, have a unique nuclear biology, and nuclear dimorphism, with structurally and functionally distinct nuclei in a common cytoplasm. These features have been important in providing important insights about numerous fundamental nuclear processes. Here, we review the proteomic approaches that were historically used as well as those currently employed to take advantage of the unique biology of the ciliates, focusing on Tetrahymena, to address important questions and better understand nuclear processes including chromatin biology of eukaryotes. View Full-Text
Keywords: chromatin biology; nuclear processes; proteomics; affinity purification; mass spectrometry; protists; ciliates chromatin biology; nuclear processes; proteomics; affinity purification; mass spectrometry; protists; ciliates
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MDPI and ACS Style

Saettone, A.; Nabeel-Shah, S.; Garg, J.; Lambert, J.-P.; Pearlman, R.E.; Fillingham, J. Functional Proteomics of Nuclear Proteins in Tetrahymena thermophila: A Review. Genes 2019, 10, 333. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10050333

AMA Style

Saettone A, Nabeel-Shah S, Garg J, Lambert J-P, Pearlman RE, Fillingham J. Functional Proteomics of Nuclear Proteins in Tetrahymena thermophila: A Review. Genes. 2019; 10(5):333. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10050333

Chicago/Turabian Style

Saettone, Alejandro; Nabeel-Shah, Syed; Garg, Jyoti; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Pearlman, Ronald E.; Fillingham, Jeffrey. 2019. "Functional Proteomics of Nuclear Proteins in Tetrahymena thermophila: A Review" Genes 10, no. 5: 333. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10050333

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