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Review

Oxidoreductases in Glycoprotein Glycosylation, Folding, and ERAD

1
The Shmunis School of Biomedicine and Cancer Research, Cell Biology Division, George Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
2
Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2020, 9(9), 2138; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9092138
Received: 31 August 2020 / Revised: 17 September 2020 / Accepted: 18 September 2020 / Published: 22 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Redox-dependent ER processes)
N-linked glycosylation and sugar chain processing, as well as disulfide bond formation, are among the most common post-translational protein modifications taking place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). They are essential modifications that are required for membrane and secretory proteins to achieve their correct folding and native structure. Several oxidoreductases responsible for disulfide bond formation, isomerization, and reduction have been shown to form stable, functional complexes with enzymes and chaperones that are involved in the initial addition of an N-glycan and in folding and quality control of the glycoproteins. Some of these oxidoreductases are selenoproteins. Recent studies also implicate glycan machinery–oxidoreductase complexes in the recognition and processing of misfolded glycoproteins and their reduction and targeting to ER-associated degradation. This review focuses on the intriguing cooperation between the glycoprotein-specific cell machineries and ER oxidoreductases, and highlights open questions regarding the functions of many members of this large family. View Full-Text
Keywords: PDI; oligosaccharyltransferase; calnexin; ER quality control; mannosidase; ERAD PDI; oligosaccharyltransferase; calnexin; ER quality control; mannosidase; ERAD
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MDPI and ACS Style

Patel, C.; Saad, H.; Shenkman, M.; Lederkremer, G.Z. Oxidoreductases in Glycoprotein Glycosylation, Folding, and ERAD. Cells 2020, 9, 2138. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9092138

AMA Style

Patel C, Saad H, Shenkman M, Lederkremer GZ. Oxidoreductases in Glycoprotein Glycosylation, Folding, and ERAD. Cells. 2020; 9(9):2138. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9092138

Chicago/Turabian Style

Patel, Chaitanya, Haddas Saad, Marina Shenkman, and Gerardo Z. Lederkremer. 2020. "Oxidoreductases in Glycoprotein Glycosylation, Folding, and ERAD" Cells 9, no. 9: 2138. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9092138

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