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Erratum published on 10 July 2019, see Agronomy 2019, 9(7), 365.
Open AccessArticle

Post-Harvest Regulated Deficit Irrigation in Chardonnay Did Not Reduce Yield but at Long-Term, It Could Affect Berry Composition

Efficient Use of Water in Agriculture Program, Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA). Parc Científic i Tecnològic Agroalimentari de Gardeny (PCiTAL), Fruitcentre, 25003 Lleida, Spain
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Passed away in 2017.
Agronomy 2019, 9(6), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9060328
Received: 14 May 2019 / Revised: 17 June 2019 / Accepted: 18 June 2019 / Published: 20 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tackling Grapevine Water Relations in a Global Warming Scenario)
Future increases in temperatures are expected to advance grapevine phenology and shift ripening to warmer months, leaving a longer post-harvest period with warmer temperatures. Accumulation of carbohydrates occurs during post-harvest, and has an influence on vegetative growth and yield in the following growing season. This study addressed the possibility of adopting regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) during post-harvest in Chardonnay. Four irrigation treatments during post-harvest were applied over three consecutive seasons: (i) control (C), with full irrigation; (ii) low regulated deficit irrigation for sparkling base wine production (RDIL SP), from harvest date of sparkling base wine, irrigation when stem water potential (Ψstem) was less than −0.9 MPa; (iii) mild regulated deficit irrigation for sparkling base wine production (RDIM SP), from harvest date of sparkling base wine, irrigation when Ψstem was less than −1.25 MPa; (iv) mild regulated deficit irrigation for wine production (RDIM W), from harvest data of wine, irrigation when Ψstem was less than −1.25 MPa. Root starch concentration in full irrigation was higher than under RDI. Yield parameters did not differ between treatments, but differences in berry composition were detected. Considering that the desirable berry composition attributes of white varieties are high in titratable acidity, it would seem inappropriate to adopt RDI strategy during post-harvest. However, in a scenario of water restriction, it may be considered because there was less impact on yield and berry composition than if RDI had been adopted during pre-harvest. View Full-Text
Keywords: root reserves; soluble solids concentration; starch concentration; titratable acidity; viticulture root reserves; soluble solids concentration; starch concentration; titratable acidity; viticulture
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Prats-Llinàs, M.T.; Bellvert, J.; Mata, M.; Marsal, J.; Girona, J. Post-Harvest Regulated Deficit Irrigation in Chardonnay Did Not Reduce Yield but at Long-Term, It Could Affect Berry Composition. Agronomy 2019, 9, 328.

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